advertisement

Features

Replanting Afghanistan

This fall, Capt. Doug Dunlap of the Guard will lead a team of four or five guardsmen to Afghanistan to lay the groundwork for a pilot project designed to effect a sea change in the agriculture industry.

Yoga: Where old meets new

Acrobatic sport parkour makes its way to mid-Missouri

Parkour combines the agility of gymnastics with outdoor settings to create a sport that encourages those who practice it to be efficient and quick. A short film clip from a group of friends who practice parkour in Columbia will be shown at the next True/False Film Festival.

Boone Junction tours showcase history

Boone Junction is a historical village that showcases the history of Boone County. The Historical Society is adding buildings to the village.

Master Gardeners cultivate more than just plants

Have you ever wondered what a Master Gardener really is? Is it just an expert gardener? How would you like to be one yourself?

Living out loud

Four local youth bands, Graffiti Out Loud, Thunderclap Douglas and the 8-Track Groove, Headlights to Sunset, and The Blumes, met at Sixth and Cherry streets to play in the third annual Back to School Garage Band Bash.

Once called ‘modern,’ this mule barn is now a slice of Columbia's history

More than 80 years ago, the Wright Brothers’ mule barn was recognized for how modern it was. Now it’s being recognized for its rich history.

The Missouri Advisory Council on Historic Preservation evaluated the building Friday for potential placement on the National Register of Historic Places. Members voted unanimously to recommend the listing.

Dog day afternoon

David Goode-Cross went out for a pizza last May and found his dream dog — Mickey.

“I fell in love with him immediately,” said Goode-Cross, a 32-year-old doctoral student at MU.

Oduduwa Day is a celebration of the Yoruba culture from Nigeria

Members of the Egbe Omo Oduduwa of Mid-Missouri gathered at the American Legion Hall Saturday night to celebrate the Yoruba culture from Nigeria.

 

A perfect cast

Performing Arts in Children and Education, or PACE, is a youth theater program that allows children as young as 4 to take theater classes and act in plays and musicals.

Ready for the county fair

Art and Transition

Lavender worked for almost 16 hours straight to finish “Meta-Genesis,” her collection of photos of transgender people and their writings.

It's Potter-mania as fans at last get to see the latest movie

Professor Trelawney predicted the crowd of expectant Muggles that flooded Hollywood 14 theater’s lobby for the midnight premiere of “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix.” She saw it in her crystal ball.

Concerts encourage green living

“Times like these demand action,” said former Vice President Al Gore, speaking to the sold-out crowd of about 52,000 in New Jersey’s Giants Stadium.

Dancing Thomas

Thomas Jackson keeps expanding his repertoire. He dances as well as sings. He chauffeurs his younger sister, Malinda, around the kitchen table on a tricycle, talks to his grandmother on the telephone, dresses himself and makes his own snacks.

Harvest onions, garlic now to enjoy over winter

It will soon be time to harvest the alliums, particularly onions and garlic. Their storage longevity varies and one is challenged to make use of these food essentials in ways that exploit their goodness.

Crafting a legacy

As members of Best of Missouri Hands, Blenda and Donald Marquardt help to support and encourage the Missouri arts and crafts community. The two also own Village Pewter and craft items such as plates and goblets. To read more about the organization and the couple, click on the Lifestyles section at ColumbiaMissourian.com.

No break for this dance

Nick Rodriguez finds inspiration in different places. “I’ll find ideas from people walking, music, actors, the ballet. Anything that can relate to dance, really,” he said.

Theme gardens are a fun way for kids to start planting

Would you like to stimulate your child’s interest in gardening? Consider involving your child in planning and planting a theme garden.

Gardeners rightly in a tizzy over season’s irregular weather patterns

The old saying “nipped in the bud” has rarely seemed more real than what we experienced this spring when two weeks of unusual heat for the season were followed by two weeks of intense cold. The four week period marked the greatest short-term weather variance in our area over the past 118 years — as I have been repeatedly told by gardener upon gardener. Their tone is always one of resignation rather than defeat as they speak their litany of losses.

advertisements