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Health

EV-D68: What you need to know about respiratory virus

In August 2014, hospital officials in Kansas City and Chicago notified the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of an increase in severe respiratory illnesses in their emergency rooms. Enterovirus 68, a rare type of enterovirus, was identified in 19 people in Kansas City and 11 in Chicago. As of Sept. 11, the CDC has confirmed 82 cases of respiratory illness caused by the virus in six states, and six others have reported clusters of undefined enteroviruses. There have been no confirmed cases of enterovirus 68 or clusters of enteroviruses reported in Boone County.

EV-D68, the virus that has sickened children in Kansas City and St. Louis and resulted in some hospitalizations, hasn't caused any confirmed cases yet in Columbia, health officials said.

Green Dot and Title IX education new to Safe Mizzou week

This year, Green Dot and Title IX educational sessions have been added to MU's Safe Mizzou 2014 agenda. The week's events begin on Monday.

Multiple sclerosis bike fundraiser moving to St. Louis from Columbia

Nearly 3,000 participants rode in Bike MS during the weekend. Columbia has hosted the fundraiser since 2004.

UPDATE: Serious respiratory illness hits hundreds of kids

Nearly 500 children have been treated at one hospital alone — Children's Mercy in Kansas City — and some required intensive care, according to authorities.

Hospitals restrict visitors because of outbreak

A hospital epidemiologist says it could be the same enterovirus infection that has hit St. Louis and Kansas City.

Gov. Nixon defends veto of e-cigarette bill

Wednesday's roundtable discussion with Gov. Jay Nixon highlighted the potential health effects of e-cigarettes.

Respiratory illness strikes hundreds of KC-area kids

U.S. eating habits improve a bit — except among poor

Researcher says the widening diet gap reflects an income gap that deepened during the recent financial crisis, which likely made healthy food less affordable for many people.

Shades of Pigpen: We travel with our own germs

The Home Microbiome Project seeks to understand how the trillions of mostly beneficial bacteria that live in and on our bodies interact with bugs in the environment to affect our health.

UN: Ebola disease caseload could reach 20,000

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa is accelerating and could grow six times larger to infect as many as 20,000 people, the World Health Organization said.

Tripping seniors on purpose to stop future falls

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago developed a treadmill that intentionally trips seniors to teach them to not fall in the future. Seniors tripping and falling costs $30 billion yearly.

 

Heart group: E-cigarettes might help smokers quit

The American Heart Association and the American Cancer Society express great concern about these popular nicotine-vapor products and urge more regulation, especially to keep them away from youth. They also stress that proven smoking cessation methods should always be tried first.

Study questions need for most people to cut salt

No one should view this as permission to eat more salt, said Salim Yusuf, the first study's leader. "Most people should stay where they are."

Health care at college: Can your teen manage?

Heading off to school is stressful for young people on a variety of fronts. Among the biggest challenges is managing their own health far from home. And it can be a trial for parents, too, in this, the era of the helicopter when it comes to raising children.

Police Department to get drug incinerator from health department

A drug incinerator was purchased by the Public Health and Human Services for the Columbia Police Department to to dispose of illicit drugs.

Health department to offer free vaccines Tuesday evening

The Columbia/Boone County Department of Public Health and Human Services will offer free vaccines to students from 5 to 7 p.m. Tuesday evening at its clinic, at 1005 W. Worley St.

How does Ebola virus spread, and can it be stopped?

Typically, outbreaks of the disease have been in other parts of the continent, not in West Africa.

'Gluten-free labeling standards kick in

This new requirement is especially important for people who suffer from celiac disease and don't absorb nutrients well.

Food allergies challenge children, parents in unexpected ways

Food allergies are on the rise, and experts are not sure why. But Columbia families like the McFetterses and the Popes are well aware of their impact on daily life.

FROM READERS: Hometown Homecare to offer free open house, cancer screenings

The organization has been providing non-profit care for 46 years. Ellis Fischel Cancer Center will be at Hometown Homecare, in Fayette,on September 2 from 8:15 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. to perform mammograms on site

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