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Health

New assistant physician law presents licensing, regulation challenges

Under a new Missouri law, medical school graduates who don't get a residency will be eligible to become "assistant physicians" and can provide primary care in underserved rural and urban communities. But the devil seems to be in the details.

Alcohol calorie counts to be on menus by next year

The new rules will not apply to drinks ordered at the bar or those that aren't listed on the main menu.

New surveys show e-cigarette use now higher than regular cigarettes among teens

Researchers like University of Michigan professor Lloyd Johnson worry the progress made in reducing teen cigarette use will be undermined by e-cigarettes.

Flu vaccine not perfect but still worth getting, health officials say

At this point in 2013, the health department had a total of 273 reported cases of influenza. This year, there have been 438 reported cases since December 9.

ANY QUESTIONS: When can I send my sick kid back to school?

Flu season is upon us. How do you know when it's safe for your sick kids to re-enter school after spending a few days in bed? Turns out there's a protocol for that.

Specialized mice testing gives cancer patients guidance for treatments

Private lab-bred mice that carry bits of someone's specific cancer can be used to see what drugs will work best on an individual.

Raising tobacco age, banning e-cigs indoors up for City Council vote Monday

First Ward Councilwoman Ginny Chadwick introduced the proposals in September, and the Board of Health has endorsed it. Convenience store owners are worried the measures will hurt their businesses. 

Confusion about medical payments leaves almost 43 million Americans with unpaid debts

The findings suggest that many Americans are being trapped by debt because they are confused by the notices they get from hospitals and insurance companies about the cost of treatment.

MU study shows high-protein breakfast curbs hunger

The MU 8 high protein diet study, led by assistant professor Heather Leidy, shows signs of increased satiety and better glycemic control.

Next steps uncertain for women with dense breasts

Women with dense breast tissue sometimes can't be told from a mammogram if they have cancer or not. New research shows that extra testing may not be as beneficial as expected, though.

Kansas City hospital researchers map children's genetics to find disorders

The genetic mapping can find rare, hard-to-detect disorders, which could reduce the number of tests needed.

MU Health Care enters joint venture in Callaway County

Nueterra will own approximately 65 percent with MU owning the other 35 percent.

UPDATE: Flu vaccine may be less effective this winter

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention officials said the flu vaccine will not protect well against the most common strain.

Horses trot into hospital as new therapy method

Animal-assisted therapy uses dogs and even mini-horses to possibly quicken the healing and recovery process, according to some studies.

Missouri oral health discussed in League of Women Voters panel

Missouri is one of the lowest-ranked states in access to dental care, panelists said.

Pregnant women to get better information from drug labels

Beginning next summer, the Food and Drug Administration will change the system to label drugs to better clarify which drugs are safe to take while pregnant or breastfeeding.

Mindfulness helps teens cope with stress, anxiety

The idea behind mindfulness is that focusing on the present moment helps a person deal better with stress, difficult emotions and negative thoughts.

Changes coming to kidney transplant waiting list

One change is that the fittest kidneys — based on donor age and medical history — will be offered first to patients who are expected to survive a transplant the longest.

Ohio bill would shield doctors who say 'my fault'

The legislation sponsored by Rep. Peter Stautberg, a Cincinnati Republican, expands Ohio's current "I'm Sorry" law, which already shields apologies by doctors. 

Researchers discover 'pre-cancers' in blood

Having one of the mutations does not destine someone to develop a blood cancer, but it raises the risk of that more than tenfold. It also increases the chance of a heart attack or stroke, and of dying from any cause over the next four to eight years.

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