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Health

MU veterinarian develops 'TightRope' surgical technique

James Cook,  a surgical specialist in veterinary medicine and a faculty member at MU, developed a surgical procedure called TightRope, named after the rope-like material Cook uses to link the two bones in the knee joint. He hopes it will eradicate the extreme, though rare, problems dogs sometimes face after knee surgery.

Sorting out stream standards

Proposed bacteria-level designations could mean the county would have to disinfect effluent in certain streams deemed "swimmable."

Living outside traditional gender definitions

A trip to the bathroom epitomizes the struggles faced by those who do not live within traditional gender definitions.

Study shows decrease in risky behavior among Missouri youth

Missouri high school students are now participating in fewer risky behaviors, according to a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Alternative medicine finds home at Johns Hopkins

Jill Eisner lay still as an acupuncturist pushed thin needles into her face and feet, soft music playing in the background. In another room, an herbologist studied his antidote for severe acne: a concoction of 12 ingredients, including dandelion roots, tangerine peel and dried raspberries. A few doors down, Linda Lee, dressed in a white lab coat, used the tools of conventional medicine to treat a patient for digestive problems.

The Johns Hopkins Integrative Medicine and Digestive Center, which opened Sept. 2, is the latest indication that alternative medicine is making its mark in mainstream health care settings.

Survey recommends remedies for farmers' high insurance rates

A survey presented by the Missouri Rural Crisis Center found that farmers with individual insurance plans spend $2,117 more each year on health insurance than counterparts who have employee-sponsored insurance or are covered by other jobs.

Sports injury research: Cheerleading riskier than football

 A growing body of evidence indicates cheerleading has become one of the riskiest athletic activities for women. Sports safety researchers reported that cheerleading accounted for two-thirds of all catastrophic injuries among female high school and college athletes.

Hospital employees urged to get flu vaccinations

The flu season can bring headache, high fever, body aches and a dry cough to the people it infects. To help protect patients, hospitals around Boone County are recommending that their employees get vaccinated for the season.

Family Health Center tries to reduce patient waiting time

The center has cut its lengthy waiting list by hiring three new health care providers.

MU battles to close rec complex tanning beds

Owners of Tan Time LLC, which operates The Spa, are still operating through a restraining order despite MU's attempt to shut down the service over the summer.

 

 

Educators disagree on minimum legal drinking age

More than 100 college presidents signed a petition last month calling for a debate on whether the minimum legal drinking age should be lowered from 21 to 18.

Amethyst Initiative pushes for lower drinking age

MU Chancellor Brady Deaton and UM System President Gary Forsee both oppose the petition, which calls for the federal drinking age recommendation to be knocked down from 21 to 19.

Health Department to show documentary "Unnatural Causes"

It will be shown starting at 6 p.m. Wednesday in the Health Department building. The series investigates whether socioeconomic and racial inequalities, more than medical care, genes or behavior, affect the health of Americans.

Choosing the right sunscreen amidst a chemical debate

Summer is almost over, but that doesn’t mean it’s time to pack away the sunscreen. Sunshine will continue to reflect off the water all fall, and when winter comes, it will reflect off the snow. 
Choosing a good sunscreen can be a daunting task.

Dean of MU School of Medicine is applicant for job in Arizona

William Crist, who is a candidate for a new position in the Health Affairs department at the University of Arizona, will visit the Tucson campus on Thursday to take part in a forum.

Mosquito season return; learn about them and how to prevent their bites

To mosquitoes, some of us are smorgasbords, and others are as tasty as cardboard. As the mosquito season begins in earnest — if it hasn’t already in your microclimate — those on the buffet line might dread its arrival more than the rest of us, but there’s no escaping.

Nixon unveils health care plan in Columbia

The attorney general promised if he's elected governor, he'll restore the Medicaid cuts signed into law by Gov. Matt Blunt.

CoxHealth to pay $60M to settle claims it paid doctors kickbacks

The payments to the government will also settle claims that the Springfield-based health care system billed Medicare for costs not allowed under federal laws. CoxHealth is not admitting any wrongdoing in the settlement.

July testing at Lake of the Ozarks found low levels of E. coli

The Department of Natural Resources took 55 samples on July 7 from the Community Toll Bridge to mile marker 30. June tests found high levels of E. coli, mainly in high-traffic areas near Tan-Tar-A Resort.

Mo. woman says Wal-Mart, health officials discriminated against her monkey

Debby Rose of Springfield said in the lawsuit that the 10-year-old bonnet macaque helps curb a social anxiety disorder that can cause her to have panic attacks in public.

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