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Health

Costs, economy drive more Americans into medical debt

With the economy getting worse, many people find themselves facing a mountain of medical debt. With employers cutting benefits, bills for the uninsured continue to grow.

MU Wellness Resource Center celebrates move to larger office

On Thursday, MU's Wellness Resource Center celebrated its recent move to a new location at 200 Bingham Commons.

Nixon plan pledges millions to MU health facilities

MU's School of Medicine, Sinclair School of Nursing and School of Health Professions could receive about $9 million through the Caring For Missourians initiative if Gov. Jay Nixon's budget proposal passes.

New campuswide smoking policy goes into effect

Smoking is now prohibited within 20 feet of all building entrances, exits, windows and fresh air intake systems. This is the first step in reaching the goal of becoming smoke-free by 2014.

UPDATE: Some Little Debbie products join snack food recall

Two kinds of peanut butter crackers will be pulled because of a potential link to a salmonella outbreak. McKee Foods joins Hy-Vee, Kellogg and others in recalling products.

Missouri home-cleaner turns away from chemical cleansers

For people who do more cleaning and have more exposure to non-natural cleaning agents — such as stay-at-home moms or domestic employees — there is a 54 percent increase in the risk of being diagnosed with various cancers, in addition to the potential for allergic reactions to the chemicals in certain cleansers.

Race and wealth a factor in health disparities

An assessment of reports and surveys shows that, in Missouri, minorities and those with lower annual incomes are more likely to have a higher rate of diseases, such as cancer and diabetes.

Sickle cell awareness in churches increases black blood donors

Sickle cell researchers in St. Louis say they've significantly increased blood donations to fight the disease with appeals targeted at predominantly black church congregations in the city.

New study firmly ties hormone use to breast cancer

A new analysis of a big federal study finds that taking menopause hormones for five years doubles the risk for breast cancer and even women who take the pills for as little as a couple of years have a greater risk of getting cancer.

Students no strangers to sleep starvation

In the last 10 years, people on average have lost about an hour of sleep each night, chipping away from 7 1/2 or eight hours to just 6 1/2 or seven. It's a pattern that transcends age; professionals, students, teens and others are among many people who aren't getting enough sleep.

Healthy people should have right to brain pills, some scientists say

A commentary published online by the journal Nature stated that brain pills provide new methods of improving brain functions. However, it stated more research and a variety of steps are needed to manage the risks.

Center hopes to breed endangered salamanders

The hellbender, considered by some to be the most grotesque-looking salamander in North America, has been on the state's endangered species list. A program is being developed to breed hellbenders in captivity and release them into the wild.

Study: Dental care in ICU reduces pneumonia risk

A study at Barnes-Jewish Hospital led by two nurses found a lower rate of ventilator-associated pneumonia in ICU patients who were given mouthwash and their teeth were brushed twice daily.

Lesson from The Biggest Loser: Don't try this at home

"The Biggest Loser‚" has made über-boot-camp-style training sessions seem a sure-fire ticket to weight loss for sedentary, morbidly obese people. And the success of its contestants suggests there's little risk — contrary to common advice that such programs should be undertaken only with a physician's seal of approval.

Author: Carbs have led to obese America

A packed Monsanto Auditorium listened to author and science journalist Gary Taubes speak about America's obesity crisis Thursday. Taubes blames the obesity problem on carbohydrates and recommends low-carb diets.

Study: Extensive artery damage exists in obese children

Resarchers linked obesity in children to heart disease.

Blood test could spot risk for heart attack, stroke

A study of nearly 18,000 volunteers in 26 countries found that a cholesterol-lowering drug slashed the risk of those flagged by the test by about half — even if their cholesterol was normal.

Brain research may prove useful in classrooms

The aim of the study, said Laurie Cutting, director of the Education and Brain Research Program at the Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore, is to understand the neurological differences among students who are skilled readers, those who have difficulties and those with diagnosed learning disabilities.

Columbia Parks and Recreation fights back against invasive Callery pear trees

Bad branch angles and heavy branches make the species susceptible to splitting, which is dangerous around roads and power lines.

Missouri mental health advocates hail federal parity legislation

A mental health parity bill tacked onto the federal economic bailout passed on Oct. 3 requires health insurance firms to extend coverage to treat substance abuse and mental health.

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