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Health

Students no strangers to sleep starvation

In the last 10 years, people on average have lost about an hour of sleep each night, chipping away from 7 1/2 or eight hours to just 6 1/2 or seven. It's a pattern that transcends age; professionals, students, teens and others are among many people who aren't getting enough sleep.

Healthy people should have right to brain pills, some scientists say

A commentary published online by the journal Nature stated that brain pills provide new methods of improving brain functions. However, it stated more research and a variety of steps are needed to manage the risks.

Center hopes to breed endangered salamanders

The hellbender, considered by some to be the most grotesque-looking salamander in North America, has been on the state's endangered species list. A program is being developed to breed hellbenders in captivity and release them into the wild.

Study: Dental care in ICU reduces pneumonia risk

A study at Barnes-Jewish Hospital led by two nurses found a lower rate of ventilator-associated pneumonia in ICU patients who were given mouthwash and their teeth were brushed twice daily.

Lesson from The Biggest Loser: Don't try this at home

"The Biggest Loser‚" has made über-boot-camp-style training sessions seem a sure-fire ticket to weight loss for sedentary, morbidly obese people. And the success of its contestants suggests there's little risk — contrary to common advice that such programs should be undertaken only with a physician's seal of approval.

Author: Carbs have led to obese America

A packed Monsanto Auditorium listened to author and science journalist Gary Taubes speak about America's obesity crisis Thursday. Taubes blames the obesity problem on carbohydrates and recommends low-carb diets.

Study: Extensive artery damage exists in obese children

Resarchers linked obesity in children to heart disease.

Blood test could spot risk for heart attack, stroke

A study of nearly 18,000 volunteers in 26 countries found that a cholesterol-lowering drug slashed the risk of those flagged by the test by about half — even if their cholesterol was normal.

Brain research may prove useful in classrooms

The aim of the study, said Laurie Cutting, director of the Education and Brain Research Program at the Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore, is to understand the neurological differences among students who are skilled readers, those who have difficulties and those with diagnosed learning disabilities.

Columbia Parks and Recreation fights back against invasive Callery pear trees

Bad branch angles and heavy branches make the species susceptible to splitting, which is dangerous around roads and power lines.

Missouri mental health advocates hail federal parity legislation

A mental health parity bill tacked onto the federal economic bailout passed on Oct. 3 requires health insurance firms to extend coverage to treat substance abuse and mental health.

MU veterinarian develops 'TightRope' surgical technique

James Cook,  a surgical specialist in veterinary medicine and a faculty member at MU, developed a surgical procedure called TightRope, named after the rope-like material Cook uses to link the two bones in the knee joint. He hopes it will eradicate the extreme, though rare, problems dogs sometimes face after knee surgery.

Sorting out stream standards

Proposed bacteria-level designations could mean the county would have to disinfect effluent in certain streams deemed "swimmable."

Living outside traditional gender definitions

A trip to the bathroom epitomizes the struggles faced by those who do not live within traditional gender definitions.

Study shows decrease in risky behavior among Missouri youth

Missouri high school students are now participating in fewer risky behaviors, according to a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Alternative medicine finds home at Johns Hopkins

Jill Eisner lay still as an acupuncturist pushed thin needles into her face and feet, soft music playing in the background. In another room, an herbologist studied his antidote for severe acne: a concoction of 12 ingredients, including dandelion roots, tangerine peel and dried raspberries. A few doors down, Linda Lee, dressed in a white lab coat, used the tools of conventional medicine to treat a patient for digestive problems.

The Johns Hopkins Integrative Medicine and Digestive Center, which opened Sept. 2, is the latest indication that alternative medicine is making its mark in mainstream health care settings.

Survey recommends remedies for farmers' high insurance rates

A survey presented by the Missouri Rural Crisis Center found that farmers with individual insurance plans spend $2,117 more each year on health insurance than counterparts who have employee-sponsored insurance or are covered by other jobs.

Sports injury research: Cheerleading riskier than football

 A growing body of evidence indicates cheerleading has become one of the riskiest athletic activities for women. Sports safety researchers reported that cheerleading accounted for two-thirds of all catastrophic injuries among female high school and college athletes.

Hospital employees urged to get flu vaccinations

The flu season can bring headache, high fever, body aches and a dry cough to the people it infects. To help protect patients, hospitals around Boone County are recommending that their employees get vaccinated for the season.

Family Health Center tries to reduce patient waiting time

The center has cut its lengthy waiting list by hiring three new health care providers.

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