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Health

Tomatoes coming back to Columbia grocery stores and restaurants

That's because the Food and Drug Administration has determined that tomatoes grown in more than 35 states, including Missouri, are not linked to the recent salmonella outbreak and are safe to eat.

 

Mo. taxpayers will be able to contribute to breast cancer services

Gov. Matt Blunt signed legislation Thursday adding the contribution checkoff to Missouri’s income tax forms.

Mother embraces challenges and joys of daughter with disability

When Kate and Christian Basi’s daughter, Julianna, was born, they said they were in a state of denial that she had Down syndrome. Now, Kate Basi says she would not change her daughter’s condition; Julianna is perfect the way she is.

UM System recognized for workplace wellness programs

The American Heart Association made a presentation at MU's Lowry Mall.

MU volunteers reach trauma victims worldwide

MU's International Center for Psychosocial Trauma team develops and introduces creative ways to talk and work with children and families suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. New Orleans is the center’s most recent focus — MU teams have made six trips to the area since Katrina hit the Gulf Coast in August 2005 — but the program has reached thousands of people worldwide, focusing on children.

MU School of Medicine opens clinical center

The seven-story building houses the Russell D. and Mary B. Shelden Clinical Simulation Center, a state-of-the-art facility for students learning how to perform medical procedures.

Yoga nidra gains popularity in Columbia

Yoga nidra literally means the sleep of the yogis; a yogi being a yoga master or practitioner of yoga. It is a sensing practice that helps to reduce stress. In Columbia, yoga nidra is gaining popularity and has also been shown to help reduce stress for soldiers with post-traumatic stress disorder.

Cause of autism cases to be debated in federal court

Families claiming that a mercury-based preservative in vaccines triggers autism will challenge mainstream medicine Monday as they take their case to a federal court.

Craniectomy surgery developed at MU shows promise for infants with skull disorder

Developed in 1996 at University Hospital by David Jimenez and Constance Barone, an endoscopic strip craniectomy requires a small incision in a baby’s skull to remove a strip of bone, creating room for the brain to grow and eliminating the buildup of pressure. In May 2007, Usiakimi Igbaseimokumo started preforming this technique and has taken over the research looking at the long-term effects on children treated by this method.

Bike, Walk and Wheel Week kicks off

The city’s seventh annual Bike, Walk and Wheel week featured several “ArtCycle’s,” the Mayor’s Challenge race and warm weather.

Relationship between popular tanning site and MU campus concerns some

The debate about the propriety of locating The Spa on campus has raised questions about the status of MU’s contract with Tan Time LLC.

 

Columbia reports first drinking water violation in 3 decades

Columbia’s drinking water in 2007 exceeded government standards for a contaminant linked to a long-term cancer risk, the city reported Friday.

Musical healing

Samuel Wong, president and founder of the Global Music Healing Institute, delivered the 2008 Carlos Perez-Mesa, MD, Lectureship in Medical Humanities about his research in music medicine on Thursday evening.

'Disposable' graduation gowns ending up in landfills

When Jeff Barnes listed his graduation cap and gown on eBay, he was thinking more about the environment than his wallet.

Barnes, who lives in a one-bedroom apartment, said he didn’t have the space or the sentimental inclination to keep the gown from his graduation at Macalester College, but didn’t want to throw it away either.

Columbia is taking steps to examine pharmaceuticals in drinking water

Testing on the city’s drinking water has been completed by the U.S. Geological Survey, and the city will launch a broad education campaign on May 1.

Mo. senators debate health coverage plan for uninsured

JEFFERSON CITY — After its flashy debut fizzled out, Gov. Matt Blunt's Insure Missouri proposal made a comeback of sorts today as senators debated legislation that eventually could subsidize health insurance for as many as 200,000 lower-income Missourians.

 

Government group instructed to gather public input on how and when to vaccinate children

A government-appointed working group is charged with picking the most important safety questions for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to research over the next five years. The group is to get public input in setting those priorities.

Third shot's the charm?

Most of the college students who got the mumps in a big outbreak in 2006 had received the recommended two vaccine shots, according to a study that raises questions about whether a new vaccine or another booster shot is needed.

Flu season is worst in 4 years, CDC says

ATLANTA — The current flu season has shaped up to be the worst in four years, partly because the vaccine didn't work well against the viruses that made most people sick, health officials said today.

Pillow Talk

I love my pillows — the bigger and puffier the better. I’ve always thought of them as the ultimate allies, cradles of comfort outside the womb, the means to melt into peaceful slumber.

And I’ve been so wrong.

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