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Health

Columbia doctor mentors mobile medicine innovators

A program to mentor teams in developing mobile medicine products includes Aaron Gray, a Columbia doctor. All 10 teams that were accepted will receive $20,000 from Techstars and can also get $100,000 from Sprint as they continue developing their product.

First guidelines issued to prevent stroke in women

The American Heart Association has released its first guidelines for preventing strokes in women. It addresses birth control, pregnancy, depression, menopause, migraines with aura, and other risk factors in women.

Veterans hospital enhancing security measures in response to patient death

A Nurse Locator System was implemented in the mental health unit of the hospital, allowing personnel to quickly respond to disruptive patients.

FDA launching anti-smoking campaign aimed at youth

The federal agency said Tuesday it is launching a $115 million multimedia education campaign called "The Real Cost" that's aimed at stopping teenagers from smoking and encouraging them to quit.

Sugar tied to fatal heart woes; soda's a culprit

It doesn't take all that much extra sugar, hidden in many processed foods, to substantially raise the risk, the researchers found, and most Americans eat more than the safest amount.

Hoffman among thousands of drug addiction victims

Philip Seymour Hoffman's death sheds light on addiction issues in American society.

Cabin fever sets in amid relentless cold, snow

Cabin fever is setting in for countless Americans as bitter cold, heavy snowfall and paralyzing ice storms keep pounding a large swath of the country. School districts across two-thirds of the U.S. are reporting higher than normal numbers of snow days, while social service agencies are trying to work around the forecasts to get to people in need.

 

Doctors: Too few cancer patients enroll in studies

One of every 10 clinical trials for adults with cancer ends prematurely because researchers can't get enough people to test new treatments, scientists report.

Medicaid expansion's impact on ER visits has complex causes

A widely publicized study that found that Medicaid expansion increases ER visits oversimplifies a complex issue, health care providers say. The real problems are related to access: There are too few primary care physicians, too few who accept Medicaid, and no sick pay among hourly wage workers.

New Community Services Department will manage Boone County health and social services funds

Revenue from the quarter-cent children's services sales tax will be a major focus of the department.

Flu season entering peak but down significantly from last year

Flu is hitting hardest among those 25 to 49, but the number of cases being reported is down by nearly 800 from last year.

Surgeon general adds to list of smoking's harms

A new report from the U.S. Surgeon General's office says the nation is at a crossroads, celebrating decades of progress against the chief preventable killer but not yet poised to finish the job.

Health Department holds public forum on community health issues

The Columbia Health Department will hear public opinions Tuesday about health-related issues facing the community.

9 flu deaths reported at 1 St. Louis hospital

All nine deaths at Barnes-Jewish Hospital involved people in their mid-20s to mid-60s, which is unusual, hospital officials said Friday. Another 35 patients were sick enough to be treated in the intensive care unit.

New mid-Missouri group brings support for Alzheimer's patients

An early-stage Alzheimer's support group will meet monthly beginning Jan. 16.

Food companies cut 6.4 trillion calories

The study sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation said the calories cut averaged out to 78 calories per day for the entire U.S. population.

Study shows thinking positive helps migraine drug work

"Every word you say counts, not only every gram of the medication," said Harvard professor Ted Kaptchuk, who led the new study.

Just 1 in 4 young teens meet U.S. fitness guidelines

Government researchers won't call the results disappointing, but lead author Tala Fakhouri of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said, "There's always room for improvement."

Hospital program connects parents with NICU babies remotely

Telehealth Love and Care service at the Women's and Children's Hospital neonatal intensive care unit allows parents to see and talk to their babies even if they can't get to the NICU.

Twins were born to work in the NICU

Jennifer Hanford and her twin, Sarah Cammack, were born in Women's and Children's Hospital in 1984 and spent almost three months in the NICU. Both of their parents were nurses in the NICU. And now, both sisters work there, too.

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