advertisement

Business

Butterball to lay off 75 workers in Carthage

The cuts will take effect March 1 by combining two deboning shifts. The high price of corn — its incease blamed on its use for fuel — was cited.

Global economy crashing Indian weddings

In a country known for lavish weddings, some couples are making tough decisions to avoid high costs in a weakened economy.

Don't get used to cheap oil, analysts say

Cuts in exploration and output mean prices are going to climb again, experts say, to the levels the were last summer. And it could happen by 2011 or 2012.

UPDATE: Majority of KC-area nursing homes score below average

A new federal database rating facilities on health inspections, staffing levels and quality of care.

Residents powering homes face insurance problems

They can't get the insurance they're now required to have by the state.

UPDATE: Debt trouble at Lee triggers auditor's warning

The publisher of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and other papers said it will  have trouble paying its debt over the next two years because of plunging revenue. The company also said its auditor questioned Lee Enterprises' ability to remain a "going concern" if it can't refinance its loans.

Survey: Recession will worsen in the months ahead

But the Midwest and Plains states are expected to fare better than the nation, a professor who oversaw the survey said.

Group says program benefits industrial farms

The Campaign for Family Farms and the Environment looked at five years of payments from the Environmental Quality Incentives Program.

Missouri lawmakers look to divert new casino tax money

The use of the projected $130 million annually in new casino taxes figures to spark debate during the legislative session that starts Wednesday — partly because new tax dollars are expected to be scarce.

Missouri court rules against Kansas payday lender

An appeals court in St. Louis has ruled that a Kansas-based payday lender — which does business in Missouri as Quik Cash — can't prevent customers from filing class-action lawsuits over its lending practices.

Grocer sues K.C.-based Dairy Farmers of America

Dairy Farmers of America is accused of buying large amounts of cheese to manipulate dairy prices.

ANALYSIS: Unemployment can aid Missouri construction

Missourians competing for public works contracts can actually benefit from high unemployment rates, thanks to a 1993 law that restricts who can be hired for public construction projects during times of high unemployment.

3RD UPDATE: Mexico suspends purchases from 30 meat plants

The plants are in 14 states, including Missouri, and the suspension caused beef and pork futures to drop in trading in Chicago.

DURA brake cables plant to close in Hannibal

A brake cables plant in northeast Missouri is closing by the end of the year. A representative for DURA says the company plans to close a plant in Hannibal.

Ho, ho, no: Toy makers say lead law harms workshops

Worries over lead paint in mass-market toys made the holidays a little brighter for handcrafted toy makers last year, but now the federal government's response to the scare has some workshops fearful that this Christmas might be their last.

Shareholder challenges CenturyTel takeover of Embarq

Embarq Corp. is facing a lawsuit from a shareholder seeking to halt its acquisition by telecommunications company CenturyTel.

Czech beer Budvar wins trademark legal battle

After a legal fight in Europe between Anheuser-Busch's trademark "Bud" beer name and Czech rival Budvar, the Luxembourg-based Court of First Instance on Tuesday ruled in favor of the Czech company and scrapped Anheuser-Busch's trademark.

Obama: HUD pick central part of economic blueprint

In a 6 a.m. e-mail, President-elect Obama announced New York City housing commissioner Shaun Donovan as his pick for the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Fed could remake credit card regulations

The Federal Reserve is considering changes to credit card regulations, including prohibiting banks from raising interest rates on existing balances unless the customer is 30 or more days late with the minimum payment and dictating how banks should apply payments that exceed the minimum.

Investor’s business 'all just one big lie,’ SEC charges

Bernard L. Madoff is charged with stealing as much as $50 billion as part of his "Ponzi scheme," in what may be the largest fraud in the history of Wall Street.

advertisements