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Black men to discuss concerns

A new community coalition will be hosting its first conference Saturday in an effort to focus attention on the issues facing black men in Columbia.

Nathan Stephens, spokesman for The Black Men United Coalition, said the meeting, The State of Black Men in Columbia, will address the sense of discrimination he feels is pervasive in the community.

Columbia man shot in foot at gas station

A 36-year-old Columbia man was shot in the right foot Tuesday night following an argument in the parking lot of a College Avenue gas station.

Columbia police were dispatched to Phillips 66, 500 N. College Ave., at 9:35 p.m. Tuesday after a shooting was reported.

Benefit earns $7,200 for vet students

First-year veterinary students at MU will be surprised by a $100 scholarship when they arrive this August.

The money — $7,200 divided among 72 students — comes from the Gentle Doctor Benefit held each April by the College of Veterinary Medicine.

Bubble tea business to leave downtown

Fusion Brew fanatics will soon have to look elsewhere to get their dose of bubble tea in Columbia.

Vinh Tran, the owner of Fusion Brew, will be closing the store June 30. He said he finalized a deal in May to sell the Fusion Brew concept to a man in Bloomington, Ill.

Judge Kelly to retire

One of Boone County’s most well-known public officials began telling family, friends and colleagues in February that he would retire from his position as associate circuit court judge at the end of 2006.

Chris Kelly told them he had been in public life long enough, and there are other things he wants to do.

Arts funding falls short of requests

Sixteen groups have asked the city for a total of $127,180 to fund arts projects in the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1.

The Commission on Cultural Affairs met for six hours Monday night to review the requests and to make recommendations on how much money the groups should get. The group has a little less than $77,000 to work with.

Blunt signs bill to curb meth labs

About a year after the Oklahoma pseudoephedrine law passed, Tulsa police are able to spend more time doing criminal investigations and less time rushing from one meth lab to another, Officer Scott Walton said.

“It has freed up officers and narcotics officers to go about and do the jobs they are assigned to do, instead of the burdensome task of cleaning up meth labs,” he said.

Cancer survivors to lead ‘Light the Night Walk’

Ryan McNeil gave up the lead role of “Henry Higgins” in Hickman High School’s production of “My Fair Lady” last October after being diagnosed with leukemia. Unable to avoid the limelight, the 18-year-old will lead the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society’s Third Annual Light the Night Walk in Columbia.

McNeil will co-chair the Sept. 23 walk with Irene Haskins, a non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma survivor, as they attempt to raise $50,000 to beat last year’s $40,000. The pair led a kickoff breakfast Tuesday to invite new teams. It was attended by about 30 people.

Seminar provides disaster training for health professionals

Missouri is the perfect state to be a leading model in disaster prevention and response, according to Roberto Dansie, a psychologist.

“Missouri has the ability of helping people of very different backgrounds find common unity,” said Dansie, the recipient of this year’s International Center for Psychosocial Trauma’s Humanitarian Award.

Columbia girls to attend national student leadership conference

Columbia, your future leaders are in the making: Xiaoke “Jessica” Cui and Jamie Andes, both 14 and ninth-graders this fall at West Junior High School, will get leadership advice this month from moti-vational speakers such as Oprah Winfrey.

Both girls were selected to attend the 69th annual National Association of Student Councils National Conference, June 25-29 in Collinsville, Ill.

Correction

A May 22, Israeli, Palestinian bring message of peace, incorrectly identified the killer of Nadwa Sarandah's sister, Naela Kara'in. According to reports in the Palestinian Human Rights Monitor, Kara'in's killer was a Palestinian. Parents Circle, which sponsored the tour that brought Sarandah to MU on May 20, could not confirm that. Also, to clarify, Yitzhak Frankenthal founded the Parents Circle and headed it for nine years before stepping down in 2004.

Homicide investigation widens

Investigators are looking for a 34-year-old Fulton man identified as a “person of interest” in the death of a 28-year-old woman.

Francis H. Kempker lived across the street from Shawnda Reed, who was found dead in her home at 414 Tanglewood Way in Fulton on June 7, investigators said.

New pupils to get a helping hand

A program to help Columbia children get ready for school is scheduled to open in August.

On Monday, the Columbia School Board approved the Park Avenue Child and Family Development Center, a partnership between Columbia Public Schools and Head Start. The center is part of the school district’s Early Childhood Initiative, which seeks to expand programs that serve needy students to help close the achievement gap between students of different class groups.

A brother lost

James and Mary Lou Ballenger stood in the crowd reading aloud the names of each service area represented by dozens of utility crews before their trucks turned onto Broadway and passed beneath a large American flag.

Columbia. Monroe City. Higginsville. Hannibal. Fulton. Boone County. Centralia. Independence.

E-mail policy at MU to be clarified

The University of Missouri System does not have a clear and complete policy on e-mail privacy, and individual campuses are responding.

At its meeting last week, the MU Faculty Council approved forming a task force to recommend a clearer policy on e-mail privacy. The campus now follows broad system-wide regulations.

Methodist church’s crosses approved

A West Broadway church can go ahead with plans to erect three large steel crosses, including one as tall as a three-story building, after a decision by the city Tuesday night.

The Columbia Board of Adjustment voted 4-1 to let Community United Methodist Church put

Summer service

The MU Office of Service Learning reports that in the 2004-05 school year, 2,429 students completed 65,000 hours of community service. Now that a majority of students have left Columbia, there is a void in volunteer help.

Angie Azzanni, program coordinator for Granny’s House, a faith-based outreach program for the Douglass Park housing projects, said it loses about 20 of its 25 volunteers in the summer.

Court heals mental health

Judy Porter is not unfamiliar with the Boone County Courthouse. She has been to the courthouse to support her grandson, Brandon Stone, who has been charged with several misdemeanors during the past few years.

However, Porter couldn’t wait to get back to the courthouse on Tuesday. She sat anxiously in the third row of Courtroom 2-West waiting for the judge to call her grandson’s name.

Enrollment to rise at Rock Bridge

About 200 more students are expected to attend Rock Bridge High School this fall than in previous years, said Assistant Principal Kathy Ritter.

Ritter said the increase stems from redrawn boundary lines.

Iowa fire chief’s seminar to focus on safety

In more than 30 years of emergency fire calls, Mark Wessel had never experienced the loss of a fellow firefighter. That changed Dec. 22, 1999, when the Keokuk, Iowa, Fire Department responded to a duplex blaze that trapped a woman and her four children.

Three of Wessel’s firefighters and three of the children died in the fire that day.

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