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Council OKs Bear Creek

A rezoning request to make room for Bear Creek Village, touted as an environmentally conscious neighborhood, won the unanimous approval of the Columbia City Council on Monday night.

The owner of the land, Andrew Guti, and residents of the area, spoke favorably of the planned development at the meeting, describing the plans as the best way to build in this area.

Chemical makes meth blush

A new product that stains methamphetamine users’ skin is being touted as the latest tool in Missouri’s efforts against the drug.

But questions remain about the environmental safety of the compound and whether evidence of its effects will be viable in court.

Springfield lawmaker would abolish tenure

JEFFERSON CITY — Professors looking to get on the tenure track in Missouri could be derailed by a bill in the state legislature.

Rep. Mark Wright, R-Springfield, has introduced legislation that would abolish the tenure system at all state universities.

2 Pulitzer shareholders sue over buyout

ST. LOUIS — Two Pulitzer Inc. shareholders are suing the St. Louis-based publishing company, seeking to unhinge its planned buyout by Lee Enterprises Inc. on claims that the $1.46 billion deal is unfair to Pulitzer stockholders.

Pulitzer, publisher of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and the Arizona Daily Star, disclosed the Delaware lawsuits in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission on Thursday, three days after announcement of the deal unanimously approved by the boards of both companies.

Missouri balks at river proposal

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. — Gov. Mike Rounds’ suggestion to tinker with the downstream navigation season as a means of saving water in the drought-affected Missouri River reservoirs was met with criticism from Missouri’s representation during a Monday conference.

At a meeting of Missouri River states, Rounds proposed changing how and when water is released for the downstream barge industry to keep more in the reservoirs and to avoid a “navigational preclude” that’s part of the Army Corps of Engineers’ master manual for operating the dams and reservoirs.

Feedback is sought on education centers

The U.S. Department of Education is asking the public to provide feedback on 20 new regional technical assistance centers created to help educators carry out the policies of No Child Left Behind, the federal act that mandates students meet specific progress goals each year.

David Thomas, spokesman for the department, said it is seeking input from the public to determine specific areas in which educators and administrators need help.

Cultural history always important

Looking across at the sloppy piles of paper lining my work table, it’s hard to forget that it is tax time. I think the whole income tax deal would be a lot simpler if we could just take our paperwork to the people at the Internal Revenue Service and let them figure it out. On the other hand, they would probably have such stringent rules and regulations on types of paper and number of sheets that they would accept, it would be a more complicated procedure than it already is.

Fortunately, for me, tax time coincides with Black History Month, a time when I’m usually busy with enough projects that I don’t have the time or the energy to give the IRS the full measure of dread it deserves. This year is no exception.

Anti-smoking plan on agenda

The bandwagon is starting to get crowded as more cities and even entire states continue to adopt stricter rules on where people can smoke. Columbia is no exception, as progress toward such a proposal moves forward.

At 5:30 p.m. today, the Columbia/Boone County Board of Health will hold its monthly meeting. The agenda includes a presentation by the Boone County Coalition for Tobacco Concerns, which will publicly unveil its proposed no-smoking ordinance for indoor public spaces for the first time.

A county with charm

Ruth Reynolds remembers when shopping at the Fulton town square was a countywide event.

“It was a big deal. People would come from all over the county every Saturday,” said Reynolds, a native of Fulton in Callaway County. “We would sit on the main street eating ice cream as our parents would do their shopping and catch up with each other.”

For some, fear rose with crime in January

Columbia started the new year with the stabbing of two men — one fatally — at a convenience store, the slaying of an MU microbiologist and the shooting of two police officers. Four home invasions, several muggings and incidents of gunshots fired into homes added to January’s flurry of crimes.

Behind the headlines and ongoing investigations are hard numbers that prove Columbia has never had so many homicides this early in the year. Within one month, Columbia’s homicide rate already surpassed the total homicides reported each year from 2002 to 2004, according to Missouri Uniform Crime Report data.

Farmers’ Market faces deadline

With its 25th anniversary approaching, the clock is ticking for the Columbia Farmers’ Market to find a permanent home.

The nonprofit group that oversees the market has until April 1 to begin construction or site preparations on such a project. Failure to begin by that date would violate the group’s 30-year lease with the city of Columbia, in which case the city could reclaim control of the land. The City Council must approve alterations to the lease.

Students learn ins, outs on energy

Ninth-graders at Columbia’s three junior high schools are learning an important lesson about energy.

The Energy Challenge program, a collaborative effort between the Water and Light Advisory Board and Boone Electric Cooperative, takes place each year as part of the schools’ science curriculum. The program is in its 11th year.

MU vet finds new way to treat horse’s tumor

In 2000, Rose Pasch noticed that her American saddle horse, Dixie, was keeping her right eye closed and ooze was coming out of it. At once, Pasch called her local veterinarian, who found Dixie’s eyelid tumor.

“He took the growth off four or five times, but it just kept coming back,” Pasch said.

New technology presented to farmers

Missouri farmers took a sneak peak at the future of precision agriculture Friday at MU as part of Ag Sciences Week.

“Harnessing the Power of Technology” was the theme for the conference that highlighted experiences and outcomes for precision agriculture in Missouri.

Medicaid cuts would hurt Mo. economy, study says

JEFFERSON CITY — Gov. Matt Blunt talks a lot about economic development. He also talks a lot about making government more efficient through cuts and cost-saving initiatives.

But a new study suggests those two priorities may conflict.

Columbia man killed in Sunday crash

A Columbia man died in a one-vehicle crash early Sunday morning.

Roy T. Gallemore IV was driving on Creasy Springs Road around 2:20 a.m. Sunday when he attempted a curve at an unsafe speed, according to a news release from the Boone County Sheriff’s Department.

Man hospitalized after I-70 accident

A car spun off the road early Sunday morning after hitting the embankment on westbound I-70 and Stadium Boulevard. The driver was hospitalized, according to a news release by the Columbia Police Department.

Police reports indicate that after successfully passing a commercial bus, Brandon S. Bruce continued his return to the driving lane to the point of hitting the embankment. After impact, Bruce’s vehicle rolled one time, returning to its wheels. Police found Bruce unresponsive. He was transported by ambulance to University Hospital and Clinics, where as of Sunday afternoon Bruce, he was listed in critical condition by hospital staff.

Multiple fires keep firefighters busy

A string of five separate natural cover fires kept Boone County Fire Protection District firefighters busy Saturday. No one was injured.

According to a news release, firefighters’ first natural cover fire call came around 11 a.m. for about an acre of land at 4026 N. Creasy Springs Road. They brought the fire under control in less than 30 minutes.

Uniting voices

On a January evening, a small group gathered behind a nearly translucent curtain in MU’s Corner Playhouse. From a nearby fluorescent-lit hallway, passers-by could hear the echo of a chant-like verse: “These are my words, powerful and unwavering. This is my voice. This is the story I tell.”

The scene was part of a rehearsal for “Voices Made Flesh,” a new collection of monologues written and adapted for the stage by a group of current and former MU students. The production is directed by Heather Carver, an assistant professor of playwriting and performance studies in the MU theater department.

Hickman grad returns with storied band

Elizabeth Virkler felt at home playing trombone in the Hickman High School auditorium Saturday. A Hickman alumna, Virkler is ajunior at St. Olaf College inNorthfield, Minn. She is in her second year as a member of the St. Olaf College band.

In its 112-year history, the band packed concert halls all over North America and Europe. Band parents like Carol Virkler,who lives in Columbia, are used to traveling long distances to see their children perform.

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