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Feline intervention

Sixteen cats were rescued Wednesday from an unlicensed broker in Iberia, Mo., by the Missouri Department of Agriculture and the Central Missouri Humane Society. The owner, Sandra Hudson, voluntarily relinquished the cats after she was contacted by the department, which learned about the cats from a Hallsville veterinarian, said Jason Ramsey, director of development and public relations for the Humane Society.

Hudson does not face any criminal charges because she voluntarily handed the cats over to the Humane Society. The cats came from an unlicensed breeding facility in the Lake of the Ozarks area that officials discovered a few weeks ago, said Jerry Eber, program coordinator for the animal health division of the Missouri Department of Agriculture.

Halloween no longer a holiday in many schools

SPRINGFIELD — Ann Waite gets “warm fuzzies” when she recalls wearing homemade costumes and celebrating Halloween by bobbing for apples and eating candy during the school day.

She is disappointed her 13-year-old daughter won’t get the chance to make her own memories, outside of going trick-or-treating on Sunday.

Natural gas rates to increase

JEFFERSON CITY — Missouri Gas Energy customers will see their natural gas bills rise by about $110 on average for the winter, the Public Service Commission said Thursday.

Missouri Gas Energy’s rate change was among several increases and decreases the commission approved for various companies. The new rates are largely supposed to account for changes in the cost of natural gas for the winter season and will take effect Monday.

County’s political division wide

In Boone County, where rural towns on rolling hills co-exist with Columbia’s trendy coffee shops and strip malls, voting patterns are as diverse as the county itself.

Within Columbia, many residents vote Democratic and are concerned about education and international relations. In smaller towns, such as Ashland and Hartsburg, many residents vote Republican and are concerned with national security and morality.

Election inspires influx of campaign rookies

Jenny Chicone awoke one morning to discover only remains of her “Bush must go” political yard sign.

“All that was left was a stick — a charred stick — coming up out of the ground, and it was pretty sad looking, and it got me motivated to become an activist,” Chicone said.

Public works unrest stirs voters

Some employees of the Boone County Public Works Department, complaining of a tense and uncomfortable work environment, hope their concerns will be an issue on Election Day.

Greg Mullanix, a union steward and heavy-equipment operator for 20 years, said some employees are working to prevent the re-election of Southern District Commissioner Karen Miller, who he called “a barrier to change.”

Absentee ballots, direct mail keep postal workers busy

With only four days left before the election, the downtown Columbia post office is busy delivering political mail. Absentee ballots as well as other political mail are being received and delievered in huge numbers. Ballots coming to the post office are delivered daily to the clerk's office.

Candidate Q&A

The Missourian recently submitted the following seven questions to every

Boone County candidate running for a seat in the Missouri General Assembly.

Their verbatim answers, edited only slightly for grammar and spelling,

appear here. While some candidates did not submit answers by deadline,

their responses will be added if they arrive before Election Day.

Reinstated license still in jeopardy for Cooper

The sign reading “No beer until we obtain a new liquor license” has faded and cracked since it was taped to the cooler at Cooper’s Landing four months ago, when owner Mike Cooper lost the license he held for 17 years.

The state’s Administrative Hearing Commission ordered the Missouri Division of Alcohol and Tobacco Control to reinstate his license in a decision issued last Thursday, but the sign is still there.

Guardianship plays crucial role in right-to-vote case

A federal judge has denied a St. Louis resident with mental illness the right to vote in the upcoming election.

Steven Prye, who is under guardianship, petitioned the court after his bid to register to vote in Missouri was rejected. State law prohibits people who rely on full-time guardians from participating in the electoral process.

Man hopes to revive local AARP chapter

Mack Brushwood believes there is strength in numbers.

So he hopes to be greeted today by a crowd of eager retirees ready to revive the Columbia chapter of AARP that fizzled out about five years ago.

Fatal plane crash near Springfield still under federal investigation

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. — Federal investigators had found nothing Wednesday to explain why a small private plane crashed while approaching the airport in Springfield, killing two of the three men aboard.

Pam Sullivan, senior air safety investigator for National Transportation Safety Board, said the probe was in its early stages.

From FDR to W

Gloria Hay and Margot Lubensky are election volunteers who have been in the campaign circuit for a combined total of nearly 100 years.

They can recall monumental political events as if they happened yesterday: Franklin Roosevelt’s Fireside Chats, Harry Truman’s triumphant grin as he held a newspaper that read “Dewey Beats Truman” and Richard Nixon’s notorious “I am not a crook” speech.

City wants millions in new roads by 2030

Columbia residents can take the wheel tonight in helping plan for the future of road funding and construction in the city.

A report prepared by a city consultant estimates the city needs $581 million worth of new roads by 2030. Both this report and a complementary plan of ways to cover that cost will be open to public scrutiny tonight during a Transportation Finance Advisory Committee hearing.

Byrd questions Nixon’s record, focus and judgment

JEFFERSON CITY — When Republican Chris Byrd began campaigning for state attorney general a year ago, he was told that a good politician remains thin throughout a campaign.

“When I started this campaign, I was told if I gained weight I was doing something wrong,” said Byrd, who has yet to add to his pre-campaign weight.

Tort reform key issue in Senate race

When Mike Ditmore started practicing neurosurgery in 1980, trial attorneys almost immediately began to seek the doctor’s advice in medical malpractice cases. Over the past two decades, Ditmore served as an expert witness in several trials from Missouri to Tennessee to Florida, for which he earned $1,000 to $2,000 a day.

As an expert witness, Ditmore saw firsthand how his testimony could affect a jury’s verdict. What he said on the stand helped decide a doctor’s guilt or innocence and how much compensation a malpractice victim might receive.

Missouri Gubernatorial Race

JEFFERSON CITY – Political and life experience have emerged as a central theme of a gubernatorial contest between Democrat Claire McCaskill and Republican Matt Blunt that’s growing increasingly negative as Election Day nears.

“In case you haven’t noticed, I’m running against a very young man,” McCaskill said of her opponent at a recent fund-raiser in St. Louis’ Central West-End neighborhood.

Giuliani visits in support of Blunt

In a close gubernatorial race, Republican Matt Blunt tried to re-emphasize his message of leadership, campaigning with the man who literally wrote the book on it: former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani.

Giuliani campaigned for Blunt on Wednesday in Columbia, as the Republican challenger for Missouri governor tried to distance himself from his Democratic opponent, Claire McCaskill.

Mo. House candidate proposes flat tax

Ed Robb, an economics expert, is the only candidate for state representative in Boone County this election who is making an issue of Missouri’s complicated tax structure.

With simplification as his ultimate goal, Robb, the Republican candidate for state representative in the 24th District, suggests several changes to the state tax code.

Education tops forum

Education was star of the show Tuesday night as a small but energetic crowd gathered at the NAACP’s last political forum to hear candidates for Missouri representative and Senate seats make their final pledges this election season.

Mary Ratliff, president of Columbia’s NAACP branch, said school funding and quality of learning are issues of particular importance to African Americans.

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