advertisement

Local

Leader urges fixes to benefits funding

JEFFERSON CITY — As many unemployed Missourians are collecting assistance from the state while they seek new jobs, they’re putting the state into debt.

It’s a debt that is forcing Missouri to borrow from the federal government as required by federal law. It also is a debt with an interest rate far higher than the state would pay if it were to borrow the money from private investors through a bond issue.

MU alters parking

A metered parking lot next to Brady Commons was packed with cars Tuesday afternoon — as usual. Yet students used to the past year’s parking regulations were in for an unpleasant surprise.

MU sophomore Adrienne Ford, struggling to find one of the last spaces in the lot, was dismayed to discover that the university has changed the lot’s meter enforcement hours from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. to 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Putting on a new face

It’s not just celebrities and reality-show participants. College-aged Columbians are doing it, too.

The “it” is cosmetic surgery, a trend that’s making headlines all over the United States.

Riding for renewal

Connie Clatt hated seeing a certain billboard on her way to parties. She did everything she could to avoid looking at it, including pulling down the mirror in the car to check her makeup.

“It got to the point that I told myself I wouldn’t look at the sign,” she said. “But it never failed. God made me look up at just the right second. It made me realize I wasn’t living the right kind of life.”

Whooping cough hits Columbia schools

Judy Snyder had a message on her answering machine Wednesday afternoon informing her that a case of pertussis, or whooping cough, had been reported in her son’s kindergarten and first-grade class at Ridgeway Elementary School.

In addition to the phone call, Snyder’s son, Alexander, brought home a letter from the school with information on the symptoms and recommended treatment for whooping cough.

Bush coming to Columbia

President George W. Bush plans to visit Columbia on Tuesday, highlighting the importance of Missouri as a swing state in what will be his 21st visit to the state since taking office.

Columbia Police Chief Randy Boehm confirmed the president’s visit Thursday but has not received any details about the trip, including where and when Bush will speak. However, he was confident the visit will occur.

High court to hear Lane’s tax suit

The Missouri Supreme Court has ruled that it will review a property-tax lawsuit against the Columbia School District and Boone County Collector Pat Lensmeyer.

The case stems from a suit filed by Henry Lane, a self-described anti-tax activist, who has run for the Columbia school board six times and failed.

Taxicabs lead funeral procession

A black limousine led a procession of seven taxicabs down Broadway late Thursday morning, honoring Robert Johnson, the former owner of Bob’s Checker Cab Co., who died Sunday.

Johnson, of Millersburg, died at University Hospital from complications of a vascular surgery performed Aug. 23. He was 69.

Roadway’s renaming set for pre-game event

As students, staff and alumni celebrate the opening of MU’s home football season Saturday, another group of people will gather to remember a man who had his own impact upon the university.

Mick Deaver was a 1966 graduate of MU who began working for the MU Police Department in 1972. In February 1980, at age 38, Deaver died in an automobile crash. At the time, he was the department’s associate director.

Panel to announce three finalists for high court job

Today, a non-partisan panel is expected to announce three finalists to fill a vacancy on the Missouri Supreme Court.

On Thursday, the Appellate Judicial Commission met with 22 applicants for the position, which was left open after President Bush appointed Judge Duane Benton to the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

High holiday traffic expected

The price of gasoline in Columbia is about 15 cents per gallon higher than last year, but that won’t stop Jenny Talbert from going on a camping trip with her family this Labor Day weekend. The MU sophomore will be joining thousands of Missouri motorists hitting the road to take advantage of the last three-day weekend of the summer.

“We always go camping on Labor Day,” she said. “It’s a family tradition because my parents have off work.”

Convocation kicks off new year at Stephens

Students, faculty, staff and guests gathered at Stephens College on Thursday to open a new school year more than a week after classes had already begun.

On Thursday, for the second time since it was stopped in the mid-1990s, the college's opening convocation officially kicked off the school year with reflection and optimism, welcoming students both new and old.

Noodles fare joins District

Missouri's second Nothing But Noodles franchise opens today at the corner of Ninth and Cherry streets, the former location of the Cajun restaurant Glenn's Café.

From its green, noodle-shaped light fixture to its pasta-themed menu, Nothing But Noodles aims to add a new style and flavor to the District's already diverse offering of restaurants.

Groups push for public-access channels

Cable and Television Corp. board members Jeff Bassinson and Steve Hudnell assured Columbia's Cable Television Task Force on Thursday that they would deliver a programming schedule in time for Tuesday's City Council meeting.

At Tuesday's meeting, the task force, along with representatives from the Cable and Television Corp. and Stephens College, will attempt to promote to the City Council the idea of a 2 percent increase in cable costs to fund an educational public-access channel.

Bush to talk about jobs, war in Columbia speech

President George W. Bush plans to talk about jobs, the war on terrorism

and the economy when he addresses area residents at the Boone County

Fairgrounds on Tuesday.

The president's visit to Columbia will come after appearances at Lee's

Summit High School near Kansas City and at the Missouri State

Fairgrounds in Sedalia.

Flu clinic to test bioterror response

In November, a flu vaccine clinic will test local health officials’ preparedness for a bioterror attack.

The Columbia/Boone County Health Department hopes to give an estimated 1,000 to 1,500 flu shots in a single day — more than twice its one-day high last year of 500 — during a 12-hour emergency response drill Nov. 4 at the health department clinic at 1005 W. Worley St.

Not-so-hot summer

August 2004 is in the books as one of the coolest since record-keeping began.

With an average temperature of 70.1 degrees, August ranked as the fourth coolest on record since 1890.

Judge rules against early voting

The state’s early voting law merely requires local officials to plan for, not implement, the practice, a judge ruled Wednesday.

Cole County Circuit Judge Richard Callahan heard arguments on the lawsuit filed by the city of St. Louis and some Democratic lawmakers last week. They sued Republican Secretary of State Matt Blunt, seeking a court order allowing an early voting period before the Nov. 2 general election.

Marathon expands audience

With the ninth annual MU Dance Marathon less than a month away, juniors Joe Gauer and Danny Collins have spent the week standing in Speaker’s Circle to rally people for a good cause.

The marathon, which raises money for the MU Children’s Hospital through the Children’s Miracle Network, will be Sept. 24-25 at the Midway Expo Center .

Deaton details department restructuring

MU Interim Chancellor Brady Deaton hopes a change in command will help the university attract more students and faculty from a wider range of racial and ethnic backgrounds.

At a press conference in Jesse Hall on Wednesday, Deaton detailed changes in the way diversity issues will be handled from now on. MU Deputy Chancellor Mike Middleton will take over as head of minority affairs, which includes the black studies program, women’s and gender studies and academic retention services.

advertisements