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Bargain hunters’ paradise

‘Oh! That is cute!” Shawna Clark, 28, says to her friend, Amber Boone, 24, as she points to a faded blue Old Navy long-sleeve shirt. Amber grabs both shoulders of the shirt and holds it against her body. It’s too large, so she quietly folds it and puts it back in a stack of shirts.

Shawna and Amber rifle through the next pile of shirts on a brown folding table, looking quickly at the tags for the magic size.

Community Sketchbook

It takes courage to vote against family’s choice

It was like the old E.F. Hutton commercial where one word spoken by an individual quieted the entire room.

Last night, I had my bi-monthly dinner for the family. After clearing the table, the grandkids played in the yard while the adults sat around discussing politics.

Tooth decay

Traveling to serve

At 23, Stevi Davis has not only seen the wider world, she has worked in it. She has taught English in Chile, put on puppet shows for children in Jamaica and repaired buildings in Venezuela.

Since her first trip to Jamaica in high school, Davis has been on at least 10 mission trips to several countries including Chile, El Salvador, Honduras, Mexico and Venezuela.

"Quotable greeting"

Don’t even think about playing a game of “he said, she said” with Ken Logsdon. He’ll win every time.

Logsdon collects quotes like some people collect seashells or marbles, in the thousands. He loves quotes so much that 14 years ago he started his own greeting card company, Post-A-Quote. Logsdon’s handmade cards pair vintage photos, portraits and postage stamps with quotations from well-known and respected literary figures, political leaders and personalities.

Seeing through foreign eyes

As a newcomer, my desire to preserve and share my first impressions of a new place made me assemble this series of photographs of sites around Columbia. In an attempt to portray the nature of town, I wandered between the real and surreal, objective and subjective, architectural and imaginative. I wanted to capture the angles, shadows and colors that might go unnoticed by those more familiar with the sites.

Association of church and state

With the election just days away, more than 100 Columbia College students and faculty and community members gathered at the college’s Dorsey Chapel to discuss a topic that has permeated this election season: religion and its role in politics.

At the forum Monday, the Rev. John Yonker of First Christian Church gave a brief history of religion in American politics, and Rabbi Yossi Feintuch of Congregation Beth Shalom outlined current political issues and their relation to religion.

The cellular divide

For Kate Swearengen, 22, the political debate over embryonic stem cells is no mere theoretical exercise.

Swearengen, a Columbia native who is studying at Cambridge University in England, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when she was 7. Her immune system killed the insulin-producing cells in her pancreas after mistaking them as foreign.

More than health at stake in stem-cell research

With life sciences a target industry for economic development in Missouri, the stem-cell debate could have implications far beyond human health.

On one hand, legislators want to reap the economic benefits; on the other hand, they want to ban research that is a core component of development.

Facing the Politics

Dressed in a Playboy bunny outfit, toy gun slung over one shoulder, Aaro Froese, owner of Gotcha! costume shop in Columbia, doesn’t look the part of a political pundit.

But wait! According to BuyCostumes.com’s Presidential Mask Election Predictor, costume shop owners such as Froese should be able to predict the outcome of the election based on the number of George W. Bush or John Kerry masks sold. If more Bush masks are sold, he’s likely to win.

Activists draft marijuana regulations

Even if Proposition 1 passes Nov. 2, medical marijuana patients will have to continue relying on street dealers to obtain the drug.

Dan Viets, a member of the Columbia Alliance for Patients and Education, or CAPE, one group behind Tuesday's referendum, said including a ballot provision that would allow patients to legally obtain marijuana would be “asking for too much.”

Parties gear up for voter ‘ground war’

Candidates, political parties and get-out-the vote activists are in the final stages of a “knock-and-drag,” door-to-door campaign to get voters to the polls.

Democrats kicked off the weekend with a Thursday rally at MoJo’s, where former Gov. Roger Wilson, urged them on with religious-like fervor.

The voters of tomorrow

Aaron Green was sure he had picked the best candidate for the job.

So when John Kerry was announced Saturday as the winner of the mock election at the J.W. Blind Boone Community Center, Aaron, 6, couldn’t hold back his emotion.

Groups working to oust judge

Several interest groups and individuals are at odds with the Missouri Bar Association over whether to remove a federal court judge in Tuesday’s election.

It is the first time interest groups have campaigned against a Supreme Court judge based on his opinions, according to the Missouri Bar.

Election reforms aim to draw young voters

White male property owners casting their votes orally and enjoying free-flowing alcohol is the Missouri Election Day scene set by George Caleb Bingham in his 1852 painting “The County Election.”

If Bingham were to paint the picture today, it might include computerized voting machines and Election Day voter registration, both among recent reforms that have transformed the election process in some states.

Road plan under study

Tens of thousands of people use Columbia’s roads every day, but only one showed up to speak at a meeting Thursday about how the city should pay for anticipated transportation improvements.

Members of the Transportation Finance Advisory Committee heard public comment before discussing options for creating a comprehensive transportation funding plan for the city. The City Council has asked the committee to prepare a plan before the council’s Nov. 15 meeting.

Missouri OKs plan for drug imports

JEFFERSON CITY — Missouri is joining Illinois and Wisconsin in a new Internet program that helps residents buy cheaper prescription drugs from Canada and Europe, despite a federal ban on the imports.

Gov. Bob Holden traveled to Chicago on Thursday to announce Missouri’s participation in the I-SaveRx program, which was spearheaded by Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich.

Feline intervention

Sixteen cats were rescued Wednesday from an unlicensed broker in Iberia, Mo., by the Missouri Department of Agriculture and the Central Missouri Humane Society. The owner, Sandra Hudson, voluntarily relinquished the cats after she was contacted by the department, which learned about the cats from a Hallsville veterinarian, said Jason Ramsey, director of development and public relations for the Humane Society.

Hudson does not face any criminal charges because she voluntarily handed the cats over to the Humane Society. The cats came from an unlicensed breeding facility in the Lake of the Ozarks area that officials discovered a few weeks ago, said Jerry Eber, program coordinator for the animal health division of the Missouri Department of Agriculture.

Halloween no longer a holiday in many schools

SPRINGFIELD — Ann Waite gets “warm fuzzies” when she recalls wearing homemade costumes and celebrating Halloween by bobbing for apples and eating candy during the school day.

She is disappointed her 13-year-old daughter won’t get the chance to make her own memories, outside of going trick-or-treating on Sunday.

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