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Balancing sports and studies

In high school athletics, the pressure is on to perform in both the sports arena and in the classroom. For many, it can be difficult to succeed in either place.

The key is to effectively manage time, said coaches, educators and the athletes themselves.

MU graduation exercises commence

Graduation ceremonies for MU begin today and run through Sunday, with a total of 4,281 degrees being conferred, including two honorary doctorates.

This weekend marks Chancellor Richard Wallace’s last graduation as chancellor. He will speak at the College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources at 1 p.m. Saturday and at the ceremony for Arts and Science at 2 p.m. Sunday. Wallace retires as chancellor on Aug. 31.

Citizens on patrol in Columbia

Frank Edwards, 77, walks with a cane, but that hasn’t prevented him from helping to lower the crime rate in his First Ward neighborhood. The former sheriff patrols the streets near his home regularly and keeps a cell phone close to his lap, ready to dial the police.

Edwards, who is part of the Citizens on Patrol program, was one of more than 40 people who attended the Columbia Neighborhood Watch Revitalization gathering Thursday night at the Armory Sports Center. The event was hosted by the police department and the Neighborhood Watch Program, which began in 1978.

Assembly passes ‘Jobs Now’

JEFFERSON CITY — Gov. Bob Holden received a stripped-down version of his “Jobs Now” initiative Thursday afternoon, after the measure was approved unanimously by the General Assembly.

“This truly starts redefining economic development in the state of Missouri in the years to come,” Holden said.

Assistant superintendent retires after 33 years

Skip Deming, assistant superintendent of curriculum instruction, is retiring after 33 years in the Columbia Public School District.

“I’ve done, hopefully, all the good I can do,” said Deming. “I am fortunate and blessed that I had these years and the opportunity with Columbia Public Schools.”

Child recovering after car crash

The 1-year-old child of a young couple killed on eastbound Interstate 70 on Wednesday is in good condition, a University Hospital official said Thursday. The hospital is not allowed to release information on the future custody of the child.

“My guess would be that family from Idaho is coming,” said Boone County Fire District Assistant Chief Ken Hines.

The spy in your computer

Imagine you’re being secretly followed while shopping in a supermarket. Everything you look at, a snooper records and radios to a distant boss. After turning a corner, you’re suddenly besieged with ads, sent by the boss, hawking everything from a time share to products designed to get rid of unwanted scars.

Chances are, you would not want to return to such a store. But this sort of shopping experience is being forced upon thousands of Americans every day — on their computers.

System fights fire, protects collections

It’s called Sapphire, but it’s not a precious stone. To the naked eye, it looks like water.

Sapphire is a new fire suppression system developed by Tyco International, which claims the substance will revolutionize fire-fighting.

Deadly accident

An accident on eastbound Interstate 70 Wednesday resulted in the deaths of a young couple and the hospitalization of the couple’s infant and two other people.

At 11:52 a.m., a 2001 Ford truck traveling west, which was driven by Anderson Williams, 53, of Florissant lost control, crossed the median and struck an eastbound 1995 Chrysler driven by Seth Owen, 25, of Rexburg, Idaho, said Boone County Fire District Assistant Chief Ken Hines. The Ford overturned and the Chrysler ran off the roadway and caught fire, Hines said.

Whooping cough diagnosed

Two Columbia students have been diagnosed with whooping cough, a contagious respiratory disease, the Boone County Health Department announced Wednesday.

Plan would make walking, biking on Broadway safer

It cuts through the heart of the city. And if all goes according to plan, Broadway, the artery of downtown, has some changes coming.

A quaint, friendly street frequented by bicyclists, joggers and parents with strollers; a happy retreat from the hustled traffic in other parts of the city — this is the concept plan developed by the Broadway Corridor Steering Committee, which is taking steps toward making that image come alive.

Floyd outlines UM plans

UM system President Elson Floyd and MU Chancellor Richard Wallace stood on opposite ends of a time continuum at a campus-wide MU faculty meeting on Wednesday.

While Wallace, who will retire in August, looked to the achievements and problems at MU, Floyd outlined plans for the system he has led since January 2003.

APY or APR, it’s all OK for Money Smart grads

What does FDIC stand for? LaVonda Carter can tell you it stands for Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.

By completing the new Money Smart course offered by the Columbia Housing Authority, Carter said she learned the difference between APY and APR — annual percentage yield and annual percentage rate — and in doing so gained financial savvy she’ll need to reach her dream of owning of home.

Police to hold First Ward meeting

Following a series of town hall meetings in which First Ward residents have accused the Columbia Police Department of little community involvement, the department and the Columbia Neighborhood Watch are hosting a Neighborhood Watch Revitalization meeting for the central city today.

The gathering is at 7 p.m. at the Armory Center, 701 E. Ash St. and is specifically focused on police beats 50 and 55, which make up much of the First Ward.

Deal in

n 1986, Bill Mullins, a Columbia resident and former video store owner, left the Black Jack table at a Las Vegas casino and walked to a Texas Hold’em game being played nearby. Back then, Mullins wasn’t an extremely experienced poker player. In fact, he didn’t know what a flush was.

But as Mullins tells it, he sat down at that table and won more than $100 off a royal flush, the highest hand in poker.

Making of stars

J.R.R. Tolkien’s fantasy world of Middle Earth has been a frequent setting for productions since the Oscar-winning films revived the “Lord of the Rings.” This phenomenon recently hit Columbia in a live showing of “The Hobbit.”

Underneath the dwarf and hobbit costumes were children from third to seventh grade helping unveil a new youth theater company in Columbia called Performing Arts in Children’s Education, or PACE. “The Hobbit,” which was the group’s first production, debuted the weekend of May 1 at Smithton Middle School.

Wal-Mart proposal pumped up

Developers of a planned Wal-Mart at Broadway and Fairview Road have decided to seek a larger store that will require rezoning and could have a final plan ready for the city as early as the end of the month.

“The plan should be done by the end of the month,” said Craig Van Matre, attorney for the developer.

Snyder aides take a hit in inquiry

It didn’t take long for the NCAA’s findings to shake up the MU men’s basketball program.

Assistant coach Lane Odom resigned Tuesday afternoon, and associate coach Tony Harvey was suspended with pay hours after the public release of the NCAA’s official “notice of allegations” outlining the program’s possible violations from 1999 to 2003.

Summer jobs focus of 1st Ward meeting

Despite confusion and finger pointing during the second town hall meeting organized to get summer jobs for low-income First Ward youths, a job fair has been scheduled for next week as well as a meeting with Columbia business owners.

The series of meetings has been organized by First Ward Councilwoman Almeta Crayton to get youths out of the streets this summer. She said that too often youths who don’t have anything to do during the summer break hit the streets and run into trouble with the police.

Harvey regarded as ‘chief engineer’ of MU recruiting

Two MU men’s basketball coaches will be absent from the team’s summer recruiting schedule. One might return this fall. The other has resigned.

Within hours of being implicated in suspected NCAA violations Tuesday, assistant coach Lane Odom submitted his resignation and associate coach Tony Harvey was suspended with pay at least until MU faces the NCAA infractions committee in August.

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