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On the rivers, they traveled into the unknown

In the course of walking, boating and canoeing nearly 3,000 miles, it was inevitable that the more than two dozen men of the Lewis and Clark expedition would encounter trouble.

Sometimes it came from within.

Holden talks at Democrat Day

Democrats from counties throughout Missouri attended the Central Missouri Democrat Day on Saturday, which aimed to unite Democrats and raise money. Featured speakers were Gov. Bob Holden and former Gov. Roger Wilson, who spoke in place of State Auditor Claire McCaskill.

Daily planner

One morning this past January, MU quarterback Brad Smith sat at a table with Scott Ashton, director of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes in mid-Missouri. The pair were discussing plans for an upcoming FCA event to be held before the MU-Kansas basketball game. During the event, Ashton and Smith would be speaking in front of about 750 young people from across the region.

Strangers interrupted them four times during their 45-minute-meeting to ask Smith for his autograph and to praise his on-the-field achievements. At the end of the meeting, Ashton asked Smith if all that attention bothered him.

College political parties debate

Close to 100 people were on hand Thursday night when the MU College Republicans and College Democrats held the first annual debate between the two groups.

New development plans afoot

Plans are in place for a three-phase development that will span nearly 1,000 acres and include about 2,000 homes, a championship golf course, a country club and a commercial area along Route WW, just east of Columbia.

The proposal from developer Billy Sapp has yet to be presented to either city or county officials, but many of its details have been unveiled at neighborhood meetings. The development should begin taking shape within two years, Sapp spokesman Don Stamper said Wednesday. Its proximity to the city and need for adequate sewer service make it a prime candidate for annexation by the city, Stamper said. Its size and scope also will require improvements to Route WW.

Chunky missile of cast iron hits residence

A piece of cast iron, apparently fired from a cannon located on the property of the Kappa Alpha fraternity, tore through the fifth floor of a residence building adjacent to the MU campus Thursday night.

Doug Miller, manager of University Place at the corner of University and College avenues, said what appeared to be an eight-inch piece of cast iron struck the roof of the building, fell through the fifth floor and settled on the fourth floor. No residents were injured, he said, but the impact blew out an apartment window.

Festival to honor Lewis, Clark journey

Sleepless nights and endless anxiety describe Mayor Nancy Grant as she prepares for Hartsburg’s first Lewis and Clark bicentennial festival and one of the largest in the area.

In the town of a little more than 100 people, Grant and her husband, Mike Rodemeyer, along with several volunteers, are setting up tents, welcoming re-enactors and worrying about the forecast, which is calling for a chance of showers and thunderstorms Friday night and Saturday morning.

Fulton remains calm in glare of spotlight

FULTON — On Thursday, a day before John Kerry is scheduled to arrive and three days after Vice President Dick Cheney left, you could have driven straight past Westminster College and not realized it was America’s political battleground du jour.

There were no banners. No protests. Few students meandered about and the Winston Churchill Museum was as dead as a department store on Christmas. It’s striking, considering the national attention the college has received since Monday, when Cheney was chided for giving a stump speech when college officials said they thought he was making a foreign policy announcement.

Developer quizzed by residents

Residents of the El Chaparral neighborhood may not love it, but they accept the inevitability of growth and development — as long as it is high quality.

Neighborhood residents got their first look at a graphic of the nearby 976-acre development being planned by Billy Sapp at a meeting Thursday night, when Sapp representative Don Stamper presented preliminary drafts to about 20 people.

School dress codes not fashionable for all

As girls' clothing gets smaller, boys' clothing gets bigger and parents' patience grows thinner, the mention of school uniforms and dress codes tends to creep into the conversation. Studies on the effect of uniforms on student behavior, however, have produced mixed results.

Kerry receives warm welcome at Columbia Regional Airport

Wilma Droz Miller and her friend Ginny Van Hove arrived at the Columbia Regional Airport at 9 this morning to wait for Sen. John Kerry's plane to land.

Kerry speaks at Westminster College

FULTON -- Democratic presidential hopeful John Kerry on Friday told a crowd at Westminster College that the word today is as perilous as it was nearly 60 years ago, when Winston Churchill warned that the "iron curtain" of communism was descending upon Europe.

Tax receipts

In case you haven’t noticed, our tax system is broken. Making matters worse, our politicians seem unable to talk about taxes without using deceitful rhetoric. Sockdolager would settle for an honest discussion of just how out of whack the country’s current tax system is. Hey, an opinion page can dream, can’t it? Here, we’ll take the initiative and start the discussion …

MU police conduct saturation patrol

Funding from the Wellness Resource Center has allowed the MU Police Department to conduct another saturation patrol, which led to arrests for 28 violations, said Capt. Brian Weimer.

Panel reviews treatment of minorities

Local journalism figures took a critical look at the treatment of minorities in the media Wednesday during a panel discussion of the same name at 7:30 p.m. in MU's Conservation Hall.

Education funds move forward

JEFFERSON CITY — Higher and lower education were big winners in Missouri budget negotiations Wednesday, as both received increases over the current fiscal year.

Higher education funding received an increase of around $20 million over the current year. Public schools got a boost with a $106 million increase for the foundation formula. The formula distributes state aid to elementary and secondary schools across the state.

Bond funds move forward

JEFFERSON CITY — A multi-hundred million dollar bond, slated for higher education “life science” construction projects statewide, took a step forward Wednesday evening when the Senate gave the bill first-round approval.

Although the bill won preliminary approval, several provisions were added that could cause it to face strong opposition in the House, including:

Parent-teacher communication a high priority

For the Columbia Public School District, parents are the key to bridging student achievement gaps. Parents said Wednesday that better communication between educators and parents is the solution.

The district sponsored a parent forum Wednesday to hear what parents of struggling students thought were the reasons for differences in student success and what can be done to address them. The main disparity discussed at the meeting was the one between black and white students.

Kerry changes plans, sets up trip to Fulton

The battle to win Missouri in this year’s presidential election continues Friday in Fulton, where Democratic presidential candidate John Kerry will speak at 1 p.m. in the Westminster College gymnasium.

Kerry had planned to make a campaign stop in Springfield on Friday. But his plans changed Tuesday, a day after Vice President Dick Cheney attacked Kerry’s political record on the floor of the college’s gymnasium. After Cheney’s speech, Westminster College President Fletcher Lamkin invited Kerry to speak to students, staff, faculty and trustees.

Family Roots

Ruth Arbuckle has to hold the “Historical Edition Columbia Missouri Herald” so close that the weathered pages brush her nose. But she can still read the 1895 account of Boone County’s history — the tale of a community her ancestors helped to define.

“They are why Columbia has become what it is,” Deborah Thompson, director of the Boone County Historical Society, said of the Gordons and similar families.

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