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State News

USDA raises prices to aid struggling dairy farms

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and his department are trying to help the struggling dairy market by raising the price paid for milk and cheddar cheese. The department estimates the maneuver will boost overall dairy farm revenue by $243 million.

Missouri housing agency considers new ethics rules

After a state audit raised concerns about conficts of interest, the Missouri Housing Development Commission is considering additional rules to prevent inappropriate ties between developers and commissioners.

Gay activists: Marriage secondary to basic rights

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender activists discussed their fight to secure basic rights and protection against discrimination and bullying as they met this week in Missouri, a state where sexual orientation is not a protected class.

Mild season in Tornado Alley frustrates scientists

A relatively low number of tornadoes this year has meant fewer injuries and less damage in Tornado Alley, but for Vortex2 researchers studying tornadoes, the relative calm has been frustrating.

St. Louis priest arrested in connection with sex case

James Patrick Grady, 57-year-old pastor of St. Raphael The Archangel, was one of three men arrested as part of a sting operation in which undercover police officers put up an Internet ad featuring young girls.

Tickets on sale Saturday for Sept. 5 Illinois-Missouri showdown

Tickets are available starting at 10 a.m. Central Daylight Time on Saturday at ticketmaster.com, by phone at 314-241-1888 or 800-745-3000 or at Ticketmaster outlets.

Recession helps MU's Wine School lure aspiring vintners

With the opening of MU's Wine School, more people across the state and nation are trying their hand at viticulture and winemaking.

UMSL offers course on climate change to public

Starting Aug. 27, experts on physics, biology and sustainability will make presentations on Thursday evenings regarding the politics and science of climate change.

Lee Enterprises posts third-quarter loss, ad sales plunge

Davenport, Iowa company Lee Enterprises Inc. posted losses of $24.5 million in this year's fiscal third quarter. The recession, combined with increased competition from the internet, cut ad sales by 24 percent.

Myanmar's Suu Kyi prepares for worst before Friday ruling

Widely expected to be convicted of violating the terms of her house arrest, the Nobel Peace Prize laureate has been gathering medicine and books to take to prison.

Longest serving Missouri judge to retire in September

Judge John Parish has been a judge for almost 36 years and has been on the Southern District for the Missouri Court of Appeals since 1990.

Attorney sues Joplin over taxes

Tom Burcham, a Farmington attorney, has sued a number of other Missouri towns, citing state law that limits cities to one, 1-cent sales tax for general purposes.

Missouri State University's grants top $20 million for 2008-2009 year

The grants came from city, county, state, federal and international agencies, businesses and non-profits and were directed at a broad range of projects.

Mississippi River ferry receives $1 million for upgrades

The ferry connecting southeast Missouri and western Kentucky will use the money to buy more powerful engines and a larger barge.

Health officials urge Missouri parents to develop asthma plan

The health officials suggest that parents talk with their family doctors about appropriate medication and with school staff about triggers.

Lawrence County Jail closed after inmates erupt

The Lawrence County Jail has been closed following an escape attempt and subsequent melee between inmates and prison guards on Saturday. The 35 inmates housed there have been transferred to other jails.

Missouri scientists seek new tools to fight malnutrition

A trio of internationally known organizations based in St. Louis have formed the Global Harvest Alliance, which aims to help the world's hungry and undernourished. They will also seek to improve enriched foods already used to treat malnourishment.

Missouri man who swam to Suu Kyi in Myanmar stands trial

John William Yettaw swam to the home of Nobel Peace laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, who has spent 14 of the past 20 years in detention for her nonviolent promotion of democracy.

Nixon's office under scrutiny regarding E. coli report

The Department of Natural Resources has come under fire for revelations that it withheld the report for a month. A Senate environmental committee has said it will investigate.

Missouri divorce case becomes part of home-schooling debate

As the divorce trial for Lisa Payne-Naeger and Jeff Naeger began Tuesday in St. Charles County, Payne-Naeger supporters rallied outside the courthouse expressing concern over whether the mother would be able to continue to home-school the couple's two teenagers.

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