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State News

Environmental groups to discuss Ozark riverways plan in Kansas City

A meeting is to be held in Kansas City this weekend to examine plans for the management of the Current and Jacks Fork rivers.

Missouri legislation to expand newborn disease screenings

The state is to add five lysosomal storage diseases to the list of 67 diseases for which babies are already screened.

Nixon appoints two new curators

Wayne Goode, a former state legislator, and David Bradley, publisher of the St. Joseph News-Press, have been appointed for four-year terms.

Missouri Dept. of Social Services pushes for day care changes

Missouri has proposed more stringent requirements for day care centers at the requests of early childhood education advocates, who have argued the current system puts children at risk. The proposal is awaiting approval of a legislative committee.

Missouri governor signs bill allowing paternity challenges

Legislation signed Tuesday by Gov. Jay Nixon gives men two years to contest paternity rulings with a DNA test.

Pickens' energy campaign marches on despite obstacles

T. Boone Pickens, who visited MU in the spring, is still touting his clean energy initiative across the country, but slumping energy prices are proving less of an incentive for Americans to buy into it.

St. Louis hospital launches fetal care center

SSM Cardinal Glennon Children's Medical Center has opened its new Fetal Care Institute, which is expected to assist pregnant women in the Midwest who previously had to go hundreds of miles for treatment.

Missouri lawmaker pleads guilty to drunken driving

Michael Corcoran, a Democrat from St. Ann, pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor drunken driving charge and two traffic charges that carried a $250 fine.

Republican primary likely in Missouri auditor's race

Two Republicans now challenging Susan Montee for state auditor job as Tom Schweich announces candidacy.

Missouri housing agency's ethics panel approves new rules

The rules were changed after an internal audit raised concerns about commissioners ties with developers.

Carnahan appealing Missouri affirmative action ruling

A judge ruled in June that Carnahan should have rejected the proposal because of a flaw in its wording.

Missouri town restricts sales of medicine used in meth

The eastern Missouri town of Washington will require a prescription for medications containing pseudoephedrine, a main ingredient in both Sudafed and methamphetamine.

Rural Missouri has potential for renewable energy, report says

The Natural Resources Defense Council said Missouri has the potential for setting up additional wind farms, producing ethanol and harnessing methane gas from large livestock farms.

Rust closes part of western Missouri bridge

A Missouri Route 291 bridge in Kansas City is closed because of rust damage and could remain that way for months.

Drury reaches out to black high schoolers

University hopes to offer college experience to students who might not otherwise get the opportunity.

Riding the bus twice a lifesaver for Missouri man

James Jones has had two medical emergencies in as many years while riding the Liberty Express Metro bus in Kansas City. Both rides, however, proved to be lifesavers.

WWII fathers sought — and sometimes found

Public military records and national archives have helped unite some families.

'Snake Lady' shares love of reptiles for 25 years

A Sedalia woman, better known to some as the "Snake Lady," gives volunteer snake presentations to school groups and said snakes have been a part of her life for 25 years.

Large Missouri family raises special-needs children

In addition to their two biological children, Arthur and Juanita Lonjers of St. Joseph have adopted and care for seven special-needs children. While raising the children takes much time and effort, the Lonjers have found their lifestyle fulfilling.

Missouri boosting payments to sheltered workshops

Thousands of disabled Missourians are employed in sheltered workshops across the state, where they're paid below minimum wage to perform basic tasks. The state's reimbursement rate to these workshops rose by $5 and is scheduled to rise again next summer.

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