advertisement

State News

UPDATE: St. Louis archbishop-elect Carlson aims for pastoral role

Archbishop-elect Robert Carlson will oversee more than half a million Catholics after Pope Benedict XVI named him to fill the post vacated in June by Archbishop Raymond Burke.

House OKs bill to keep vehicle sales fees under $200

New legislation passed Tuesday by the Missouri House allows vehicle dealers to charge customers less than $200 for paperwork processing.

Nixon's small-business loan plan gets Missouri board's OK

A new program is expected to give $2 million to small businesses that have five or fewer employees.

UPDATE: Convicted killer's lawyer seeks stay of execution

Convicted of killing a Missouri man 15 years ago, Dennis Skillicorn is set for execution May 20 unless his lawyer can secure a stay.

$15 million settlement announced in Missouri insurance case

Three insurance companies have agreed to pay $15 million to settle a long-standing lawsuit over long-term care policies in Missouri. American Heritage Life Insurance Co. and Mutual of Omaha Insurance will pay $11 million, while Wakely and Associates will pay $4 million.

Pope names new St. Louis archbishop

Sixty-four-year-old Bishop Robert J. Carlson of Saginaw, Mich., has been named as the new archbishop of the city.

Missouri's finances might not meet earlier predictions

State Budget Director Linda Luebbering addressed Missouri lawmakers Monday, saying revenue estimates made earlier in the year might not meet expectations.

Sales tax exemption continues through Saturday

Missourians buying Energy-Star appliances will be exempt from state sales tax through Saturday.

Video conference to discuss public school dropouts

About 600 educators and community leaders in 21 locations around the state will exchange ideas Monday.

Carthage residents experience mixed feelings about smelly plant closing

Renewable Environmental Solutions was forced to close its plant in Carthage that converted turkey guts, bones and feathers into diesel fuel after it filed for bankruptcy. Fifty residents lost their jobs at the plant that has been investigated by state leaders several times after Carthage residents complained about the smell the plant produced that was, "...so bad that it would buckle your knees," according to mayor Jim Woestman.

Lawyer of Clemson student killer says witness harassed

Defense attorney Jim Bannister claimed the prosecution has tried to scare off an expert witness in the case. Prosecutors said the witness was practicing social work without a license.

Reservist who refused deployment faces hearing

Matthis Chiroux, 25, could lose certain military benefits if he receives a general or other-than-honorable discharge. He would lose all benefits if he receives a dishonorable discharge.

A.G. Edwards CEO from St. Louis dies

Benjamin Edwards III expanded a St. Louis brokerage firm nationally, and was active with the St. Louis United Way and the St. Louis School District.

Penny slots making lots of cents in Missouri

Many casino customers prefer more modern machines.

Probe continues as funeral is held for fire victims

The three children who died in a Holts Summit house fire died of carbon monoxide poisoning, according to an autopsy. Investigators still don't know how long it will take to determine the cause of the fire.

SW Mo sheriff wants inmates to help with costs

Green County Sheriff Jim Arnott wants to charge inmates for booking and medical costs in response to the county commissioner's request for budget-cutting ideas.

KC art museum to display first part of redo

Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art went ahead with the $17.2 million upgrade despite recent budget cuts.

Tulsa man arrested in southwest Missouri in Internet sting

The man, who authorities say was meeting with an undercover cop who posed as a 13- year-old girl, was arrested with duct tape and a loaded weapon.

Scott County deputy working real life cold case

Lt. Jerry Bledsoe has been following leads on the 1979 disappearance of Cheryl Anne Scherer.

Missouri House approves $700 million university bond issue

The approval of the proposal, which would allocate $700 million to university construction projects through bonds, comes as a House committee considers using federal money for the projects, whose funding was suspended earlier this year.

advertisements