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Letters to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Women don't need politicians to help with abortion decisions

The proposed 72-hour waiting period will only make the process of abortion more difficult for women.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: The fight for reproductive freedom continues

Although significant steps have been taken toward achieving women's reproductive freedom in the 40 years since Roe v. Wade, the struggle is ongoing.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Schedule screenings to prevent disease, even death

January is Cervical Health Awareness Month. Women can start the year off right by taking charge of their health and getting Pap tests.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Clark Lane needs sidewalks first

The residents of the Clark Lane neighborhood propose building a grass buffer and then concrete sidewalks on both sides of Clark Lane from Woodland Spring to McAfee.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Israel does not target civilians

There are legitimate criticisms of Israel, but targeting civilians in rocket attacks is not one.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Grieving the loss of the Christmas spirit

The belief in the power of innocence and compassion has faded into Christmases past.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Thank you, City Council, for Medicaid resolution

Columbia resident Ben Edes writes that he hopes Columbia's representatives in Jefferson City are listening.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Rural electrics should support clean energy

Electric consumers need to educate themselves about the true cost of coal, in dollars and in health and environmental effects.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: 'Verified Response' system for alarm calls has limited support

Many law enforcement organizations instead support a model that maintains police response while reducing unnecessary burglar alarm calls.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Missouri voters, not legislature, should make decision on marijuana legalization

The issue of marijuana legalization must go to the voters, not the legislature, Colorado resident Stan White writes.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Kelly's economic argument based on 'sugar daddy' theory

The sugar daddy economic theory is that the federal government will pay and not charge citizens anything. In a recent editorial, Rep. Chris Kelly, D-Columbia, stated that the federal government will pay for all of the Medicaid cost through 2016.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Government should not be allowed to limit free markets

When government takes over a market removing competition, it is no longer free to compete with other like businesses.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Missourians have right to know what is in our food

There is no issue more profound than what we put into our bodies. Yet, we regularly consume foods that contain GMO ingredients without knowing it.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Displacing blame won't lead to peace in Israel

A flier by the Fellowship of Reconciliation protesting Noam Bedein's recent speech was doublespeak.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Ryan Ferguson should have been allowed to speak to students

My tax dollars paid to prosecute this man who served nine years in jail for a crime he did not commit.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Organizations work together to reduce hunger

Community Kitchen, Inc. partnered with Rural Development to address issues of hunger and food insecurity in Missouri.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Removing regulations can improve business, protect workers

Dave Griggs, owner of Dave Griggs Flooring America in Columbia, urges public officials to remove regulations on small businesses.

 

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Elected officials should help modernize regulations for small businesses

An excess of regulations is overwhelming small businesses across the country. With bipartisan support, our politicians could help cut much of the red tape.

GUEST COMMENTARY: Fairness means inclusive policies for all Missourians

In Missouri, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people can be fired from their jobs, evicted from their homes, and denied access to public accommodations and services.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Privatizing Medicaid only costs more money

Administration costs of Medicaid are about 3 percent, but with private health carriers it is about 30 percent. That is 27 percent less money to pay doctors.

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