advertisement

Dear Reader

No room for insensitivity in the newspaper

Jabs at political correctness are no excuse for a newspaper to print inappropriate words, and the Missourian encourages readers to think about and comment on the stories we run.

Sense of optimism surrounds news industry’s latest innovations

This year’s Associated Press Managing Editors conference was full of stories of newspapers reinventing themselves and embracing technology to deliver news in new ways.

Search malfunctions frustrate Missourian editor

Missourian editor provides helpful links that direct the public to stories of interest.

Decision to hold back names not taken lightly

The Missourian is in the business of revealing, not concealing. So you deserve to know more about our rationale for withholding names twice in the last two weeks.

Speaking with ‘one voice’ silences important discussion

Public bodies that only give the party line are dangerous to the health of meaningful talk in our town.

Public deserves to be involved in final high school site decision

The Missourian has made coverage of Columbia's new high school site a priority.

Contact the newsroom

This provides an e-mail link to the Missourian newsroom.

Media, public opened high school debate

Missourian coverage of where to put a new high school helped force a more public discussion.

Distasteful journalism should not be tolerated; residents must stand up for African-Americans

Take some lessons from the recent Missourian article, entitled “The Saga of the Warrens” (Aug. 25) if you want to know how African-Americans are really regarded by some of the Columbia community and MU.

Dear Reader: Missourian’s new approach is immediate delivery on Web

Liz Heitzman, the Missourian’s immediacy editor, describes the newspaper’s new approach to delivering news — constant and immediate coverage via the Web site.

What appears to be no news can be news after all

On Tuesday, your Missourian published a story about the refusal by leaders of Columbia Public Schools to provide a list of property owners they contacted during the search for a site for a high school. The article appeared on the front page, below the fold, but with a headline large enough to grab your attention.

Was this news? It’s a valid question. Let’s face it.

Everybody gets to participate in gathering the news

It’s not every day that you get a headline like “helicopter crashes” in our fair town. As a matter of fact, I’m not sure the last time I saw one of those birds flitting above the tree line. But crash we had on Tuesday.

NFL decides not to be sporting about journalists at pro events

The big leaguers in the newspaper industry — associations with acronyms and memberships of top editors — have been sending letters of protest to the NFL this summer. The fuss: new rules.

Looking for ways to help Columbia envision the future

On Wednesday, according to my newspaper, 13 citizen topic groups hit their deadline for turning in their ideas for what needs to happen to improve our town. I’m betting there will be interesting results.

Watching the school board is a group effort by journalists, citizens

Missourian reporters Kendra Lueckert and Jewels Phraner on Wednesday tried to meet one of journalism’s higher callings — holding your government accountable — with a story about school district officials’ decision on where to place Columbia’s third major high school.

New insights for the future of your newspaper born at retreat

A couple of weeks ago, 15 Missourian editors went to the woods to talk. I described the goal this way in an earlier letter to you: What is the new compact between the Missourian and the citizens it serves?

Dialogue and community input lacking in choice of school site

Last week, the Missourian reported on a hearing about the school board decision to locate a new high school on South Rangeline Road. The online headline began with “Public unhappy.”

Transparency in the newsroom makes for better journalism

Across the street from the Missourian building, professors and Ph.D. students like me pontificate and ponder about journalism. This week, we got to practice what we preach.

Readers, editors are starting to define a new relationship

I’ve talked about it before in this space: that you, dear reader, are forcing my profession and your newspaper to re-examine just about everything.

Join the community gathering at MyMissourian.com

The easiest part of being a journalism professor may be teaching. The toughest part is trying to figure out what journalism will look like when our students are my age.

advertisements