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Dear Reader

DEAR READER: Let the light shine for open government

The Missourian will take part in celebrating Missouri's open record law as part of Sunshine Week.

DEAR READER: Copy editing resembles the art and method of solving mysteries

Copy editors can draw on techniques used by Sherlock Holmes and Perry Mason to solve editing mysteries in their daily profession.

DEAR READER: Your Missourian sports section is a winner

The Missourian sports department was recognized by the Associated Press Sports Editors for 11 awards, its most since 2001. The formula: the story less traveled.

DEAR READER: Thanks for a year of your stories

The Missourian's From Readers section will have its first birthday this weekend. To help celebrate, the Missourian will randomly pick people who have contributed to the section to win prizes next week.

DEAR READER: Open records benefit community

Two separate incidents regarding open records this week showed that journalists are not the only citizens using the Missouri Sunshine Law.

DEAR READER: The newsroom takes coffee to town

The Missourian expects to hold chats around town and invites the public to attend. Editors want to hear your ideas and complaints about the Missourian, and you might want to air them.

DEAR READERS: Headlines can stir up heaps of trouble

If it were easy, everyone would be writing headlines. Unfortunately, even the pros get caught up in mayhem and mishaps that show up in print or online.

DEAR READER: Finding the story behind an MU job candidate with ties to Abu Ghraib

An email from a retired MU professor prompted the first article written by the Missourian, and that article will be followed up on.

DEAR READER: Newtown overwhelmed by outpouring of support

On behalf of city officials, the editor of The Newtown Bee asks that the donations of physical goods be directed to local agencies in memory of those lost at Sandy Hook Elementary. A fund is set up for monetary donations.

DEAR READER: Acts of kindness amid an act of evil

The most important thing I can do is continue to ask good questions of my reporters and editors to help cover the search for solutions.

DEAR READER: 'Dooziewhoppers' create havoc for copy editors

A poorly written sentence, an illogical sequence of cause and effect, missing facts and incorrectly spelled names make Missourian's copy editors to go "dooziewhopper."

DEAR READER: 'Against the Odds' stories inspire awe, tears

MU journalism students compile inspirational stories about people who have somehow overcome the odds.

 

DEAR READER: Here's the story behind the Michael Dixon Jr. story

Missourian reporters and editors had to consider a number of issues in our reporting of the story surrounding Michael Dixon Jr. and the allegations against him.

DEAR READER: Misused words sound sour notes

In editing, there's no reason to give berth to misused and misspelled words. But help is available for folks who don't know the difference between troop and troupe.

DEAR READER: Celebrity sells, and we're the ones buying

The news of Gen. David Petraeus' affair and Gary Pinkel's divorce have grabbed media's attention. The stories of rich and famous might not be the most newsworthy content, but we know we still want them.

DEAR READER: What's yummier: Elections or Halloween candy?

As Election Day approached, Missourian staff planned for potential outcomes in preparation for an inevitably late night. Despite the unknown, excitement escalated in the newsroom, reflecting optimism surrounding democracy.

DEAR READER: It is not just another election year for the Missourian

The Missourian's campaign coverage has been outstanding this year with hardworking reporters and editors.

DEAR READER: 'Its' tops the list of endangered words

There just seem to be some words that people continually misuse or leave out all together. It's, their and this are most often the victim of this grammar offense. 

DEAR READER: The incident in question involved three letters — DGB

Social media allows journalists to now ask the public for assistance in filling in the gaps.

DEAR READER: It doesn't take a madman to create a dictionary, but story shows it helps

"The Professor and the Madman" tells the story of the making of the Oxford English Dictionary and the two men who created it.

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