Stu Schmeets, left explains the Magnetom Terra to Edward Yeh at the Alliance for Precision Health event

Stu Schmeets, left explains the Magnetom Terra to Edward Yeh at the Alliance for Precision Health event on Friday at the Patient-Centered Learning Center. The machine is an MRI scanner for diagnostic imaging, allowing a user to switch between clinical and research operations.

A collaboration that is to improve rural access to health care, research and medical treatment was announced Friday by the University of Missouri System, MU Health Care and Siemens Healthineers.

Officials from the UM system, MU Health Care and Siemens outlined objectives for The Alliance for Precision Health. It will be located at the NextGen Precision Health Institute, a $220.8 million project that includes a new facility and initiative to combine research from all MU’s schools. The UM System held a June groundbreaking for the Institute.

“The strategic alliance focuses on four key pillars: health care delivery, education and workforce development, health care innovation and research and collaboration to improve the quality of care for patients in Missouri and around the world,” according to a joint news release.

The 10-year partnership agreement is valued at $133 million, the release said.

Talissa Altes gives a speech at the Alliance for Precision Health press event

Talissa Altes gives a speech at the Alliance for Precision Health press event on Friday at the Patient Centered Care Learning Center. Siemens Healthineers and the MU system have partnered to provide the latest technologies and innovation to MU healthcare. "[This technology] will provide better pictures of patients with the lowest possible radiation," said Altes.

The partnership will have a significant impact on patient outcomes, said Talissa Altes, chair of radiology at the MU School of Medicine.

She said a new Seven Telsa MRI Scanner will produce images with higher resolution, or halve a typical 40-minute scan time, making the patient more comfortable.

Rural patients could go to a local hospital, but have the images read at the center.

Herbert Westin, reads MRI results during a demonstration at the Alliance for Precision Health event

Herbert Westin, reads MRI results during a demonstration at the Alliance for Precision Health event on Friday at Patient-Centered Learning Center. “I really believe that, working together, we are going to transform healthcare,” said David Pacitti, president and head of the Americas for Siemens Healthineers.

MU Health Care CEO Jonathan Curtright, while speaking along with UM System President Mun Choi and Siemens Healthineers’ President David Pacitti and others, said the alliance will also create new curriculums and bolster job training.

Daniel P. Mehan, CEO of the Missouri Chamber of Commerce, said the collaboration would boost the state’s already growing technology sector.

The partnership will impact research as well as the workforce, with jobs for cyber security, design engineers and clinical engineers, according to Elizabeth Loaba, Vice Chancellor for Strategic partnerships and the dean of the engineering program at MU.

Loaba said that Siemens wants to hire more engineers.

“In particular they are really interested in service engineers, clinical engineers, design engineers, those in the space that work in computer science, artificial intelligence and machine learning,” Loaba said.

  • General Assignment, summer 2019 Studying investigative journalism Reach me at krfhf6@mail.missouri.edu, or in the newsroom at 882-5700

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