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PHOTO GALLERY

MU brings its Jewish community together with Kol Nidre feast

  • 1 min to read

Kol Nidre, an observance that occurs during the Jewish High Holy Days, was hosted by Mizzou Hillel on Wednesday in Columbia. People come from far to attend the event and share a feast before the 25-hour Yom Kippur fast begins Thursday.

Rabbi Jonathan Rudnick, a Kansas City Jewish community chaplain

Rabbi Jonathan Rudnick, a Kansas City Jewish community chaplain, grabs one of the Torahs from the Ark to prepare for Kol Nidre on Wednesday in Columbia. “In this kind of community where people are coming from different places and different backgrounds, it’s really important that there’s an open space that Jewish people can connect and gather in community,” Rudnick said. “So, for me, it’s very special to be a part of that.”

Mizzou Hillel hosted Kol Nidre at the Danciger House Hillel Foundation

Mizzou Hillel hosted Kol Nidre at the Danciger House Hillel Foundation on Wednesday in Columbia. Kol Nidre occurs on the eve of Yom Kippur and involves eating a filling meal with loved ones before a 25-hour fast.

Racy Guinan holds her baby Rory as she greets her husband Andrew Guinan

Racy Guinan holds her baby Rory as she greets her husband, Andrew Guinan, at Kol Nidre on Wednesday in Columbia. While the event is hosted by the student organization Mizzou Hillel, people come from all over to be a part of the High Holy Day celebrations.

Amissa Blumenthal, a freshman at MU, eats penne pesto during Kol Nidre

Amissa Blumenthal, a freshman at MU, eats penne pesto during Kol Nidre on Wednesday in Columbia, Mo. “Before Yom Kippur, I just try to eat as much as I can,” Blumenthal said. “I always get hungry during the fast so I try to eat a lot so I can be sustained during the rest of the day.”

Rabbi Jonathan Rudnick and Jordan Kodner wrap the Torahs in “tallit,”

Rabbi Jonathan Rudnick and Jordan Kodner wrap the Torahs in “tallit,” or prayer shawls, to prepare for Kol Nidre on Wednesday in Columbia. Because the event was held outside to adhere to COVID-19 safety guidelines, tallit are used to cover the Torahs when outdoors to show respect. 

Jennah Klein has a “shamash” tattoo, meaning “sunshine” in Hebrew.

Jennah Klein, pictured Wednesday, has a “shamash” tattoo, meaning “sunshine” in Hebrew. “I’ve always been a part of the Jewish community all my life,” Klein said. “It’s a very important part of who I am. I love being Jewish, and it’s really nice to have a group of people. Knowing that we’re all here is just really important to feeling welcomed and happy on Mizzou’s campus.”

Joe Shifrin converses with fellow student Amissa Blumenthal

Joe Shifrin converses with fellow student Amissa Blumenthal, left, and Mizzou Hillel Director of Student Life Jordan Kodner. “I’ve been to this event once before,” Shifrin said. “And it’s a good way to get to know the Jewish community here.” 

A student pushes a cart of books outside to prepare for Kol Nidre

A student pushes a cart of books outside to prepare for Kol Nidre on Wednesday in Columbia. The books are used after the feast and during the services and prayer of Kol Nidre. 

  • General Assignment Photographer, Fall 2021 Reach me at mccaskillc@mail.missouri.edu, or in the newsroom at (573) 882-5720

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